ChristopherClydesdale with a capital AWESOME

Posts by cnichols2000


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Forum Topic Date Replies
Fitness Weight Training Feb 13 2013
18:25 (UTC)
53
Original Post by gordomoose:

Any thoughts on the excerpt i posted by that kinesiology professor

Reading along: "Perhaps the simplest explanation of specificity is the adaptations are brought about predominantly in the muscle groups trained. Training of the lower body (i.e., legs) does not necessarily bring about increased strength or power of the upper body (i.e., arms). The performance of a squat, sometimes thought of as a lower-body exercise, does bring about some increased strength in the muscles of the upper and lower back because of the support of the load. However, most lower-body exercises, such as the leg press and knee extension, cause minuscule or even nonexistent physiological adaptations in the upper body. Training adaptations are all specifically related to the demands for recruitment of muscle tissue caused by the performance of the exercise movement with a specific resistance."

So let's apply this to the example sport of picking up your kids. This is best accomplished by partially squatting to the floor, putting your hands under the kid's armpits, and standing up while drawing the kid near. Squats are immediately functional, both in concentric contraction of the lower body muscles as well as the isometric contraction necessary to keep the spine in proper alignment. Deadlifts further augment strength by developing a significant amount of upper body strength used in isometric contraction to hold the kid near. Presses develop the shoulder and arm muscles used to press the kid sky high. And having more than the minimum strength necessary to do all this means you stand a better chance of moving out of the way when the kid pukes on you.

A properly designed strength training program takes advantage of the fact that the homeostatic disruption caused by squats is much larger than that provided by the component exercises, and the recovery processes apply to the entire body. So you do your squats with pretty heavy loads, presses with much lighter loads, and deadlifts with more heavy loading, and the press benefits from the other two exercises. You get far more directly useful adaptation from this than squats with a slosh tube combined with arm curls.

From the second link, the very first argument posited is, "A large part of strength training is skill acquisition." Which is partially true, but glosses over the neurological adaptations acquired. To wit, an increasing number of motor units are recruited to contract the muscle. Increasing the gross strength of the muscle requires fewer motor units, which decreases fatigue and enhances accuracy, or allows larger force to be generated as needed. Which implies that increasing base strength allows for greater technique-specific adaptations later (also stated in the summary, "Supplementary maximal training may be beneficial because it stimulates maximal adaptation. However, that adaptation should be achieved before serious technique work begins.").

Also in the summary, "Non-specific training has a high probability of being counter-productive." A baseball player cannot strengthen her swing by swinging a club; any strength gains made from the increased loading would be negated by the loss in coordination required to actually hit a ball. For the same reason, boxers don't train by throwing punches while holding dumbbells in their hands. But someone who's out to get an increase in overall strength/speed/coordination is going to get far more out of general strength training. In other words, his sport-specific training is the athlete's strength training.

I watched a few minutes of Crossfit Games a few time periods ago. The event was three rounds of double bangers. Just an incredible display of virtuosity and strength (think about how your arms feel after pounding a sledgehammer for 30 s, then imagine jumping rope with your arms like that, repeat). Ain't no way that's going to happen at that level without practicing the very same sequence. But the trainee with a 400 lb squat and 250 lb bench has more power- and force-generating capacity than a 250 lb squat and 175 lb bench. The stronger trainee will be able to move the block in a little less time and have somewhat more coordination to get all the double-unders, and at the end of this event, have a little less fatigue than his competitor.

It's not a replacement for sport-specific training, but I'm saying it's a great enhancement, and it's a good base for general life tasks like picking up a squirming kid.

Fitness Is this enough to get my lower body in shape? Feb 13 2013
15:50 (UTC)
2

Starting Strength

Takes about 45 minutes 3x/week, but it's worth the added time. Don't neglect your upper body.

Fitness Weight Training Feb 12 2013
21:39 (UTC)
60
Original Post by gordomoose:

Besides, it's common sense that if you've been picking your kids up for years, and they've grown heavier, you've gotten stronger from it.  

If we're going to rely on common sense, then you can't argue that Starting Strength is better than "functional training" because the loads involved are much greater, leading to greater overall strength, even for out-of-plane exercises. It's just common sense.

Fitness Half-Marathon Training Feb 12 2013
13:05 (UTC)
2
Original Post by HorseDreamer: Last summer I was able to run 15 miles at 6:30-7 min/mi pace.

So do what you did last summer.

Fitness Why the hell do people think horseback riding is exercise? Feb 10 2013
01:25 (UTC)
21
Obvious troll is obvious.
Fitness ??? about cals Feb 08 2013
14:26 (UTC)
1
Original Post by mom2losew8:

I have head on other calorie sites that we should eat back half if not all our exercise cals…doesn't make sense to me.  We burn them off why would we eat them back.  Just wondering if anyone does that?

TIA

The logical fallacy here is that "exercise is a thing I do to burn calories" and "food is evil stuff that turns into fat". If you change your personal definition to "exercise is a thing I do to increase [adaptation] so I can enjoy my life more" (substitute "strength", "endurance", whatever), then food becomes "stuff that fuels me so that I can exercise". Bonus points if you figure out that "exercise can be fun in and of itself".

Fitness new workout routine going in effect tomorrow , help? Feb 08 2013
14:19 (UTC)
4
Original Post by floggingsully:

If adding a bunch of extra stuff to a program made it more effective, the program would probalby already have that extra stuff included.

Seconded.

Fitness Managing Calories and Exercise Feb 08 2013
14:18 (UTC)
7
Original Post by ChadLavender:

As far as exercise goes I want to add in C25K and either the 30 Day Burn or the Turbulence Training.

Pick one. Any one is challenging; two at once is pretty nuts, and you're really asking for to burn out.

I agree with dbackerfan re: weights, and you should check out Starting Strength for future reference. Great program, and it's really something how the added strength carries over to the rest of your life. But until then, I vote for running. C25K has good progression and a lot of followers, and at the end you have a concrete accomplishment.

Fitness How to stop legs from being weak during morning cardio Feb 08 2013
14:01 (UTC)
2
Original Post by rachiesk:

I would love to thank everyone over the debate on Jillian instead of answering the original question.

 

I'll go find another board to post on.

WTF. #2, "warm up with some dynamic stretches". #3, "make sure you are well hydrated", "could be low blood sugar so eat something that digests quickly". #5, "you're eating at an unsustainable caloric deficit". #9, "you're undereating and overexercising". Plenty of answers here.

If you have low energy when performing this metabolic workout, the solution is not "go find another board", it's "figure out how to get more energy". You have a few things to try here. Have you already tried them and not gotten results? If so, make with the followup info.

Fitness Am I exercising enough to make my goal? Feb 07 2013
19:41 (UTC)
1
Original Post by jackiel87: I am always so worried of looking muscular since I am so tall I just imagine a monstrous muscular lady lol.

As long as you stay away from steroids and anything that'll change your genetic profile to that of a man's you should be all set.

Fitness is this enough training? Feb 07 2013
19:25 (UTC)
1

It's enough time to do 3 days of Starting Strength and 1 day of metabolic conditioning. That'll get you an increase in strength and decrease in bodyfat%. Or 4 days of endurance training, which can get you to the point where you can finish a sprint triathlon. Or 4 days of metabolic conditioning, which might get you to the point where you can pass the Army/police/firefighter's physical qualifier. Or 4 days of plodding along on the treadmill and spinning your wheels on the Nautilus circuit, which will get you not far at all. Choose wisely.

Fitness please help me Feb 07 2013
16:01 (UTC)
9

Forget about your weight. What are your dreams? What do you want to do?

Fitness 30 day shred NO results Feb 07 2013
15:11 (UTC)
1
Original Post by voicesinsideher:

today i finished day 18 on 30 day shred .i started level 3 today. tad early i know. anyway i have had ZERO inches lost. i havent weighed myself for fear of seeing the # go up & giving up & stopping. I stay good on the advance moves occasionally doing the cheatvmoves. Im on a 1300 calorie a day but after exercise I really end up eating around 16-1700 its all clean healthy foods. idk why im not seeing anything! I feel my body getting stronger and thats good but I want to see my results. Im in the 140s and im ok with my weight my goal is to just tone up some. Im about 5'7 with a 31" waist & 40" hip. Im not happy with that. I am also on day 5 of ripped&in 30 week 1 Anyone else having these problems? Bc I feel like its just me.

Sigh. No, lots of people are eating in the neighborhood of their BMR (you: 1750-ish) and maintaining a significant caloric deficit while engaging in exercise with a moderately high level of intensity, and not really seeing any composition changes.

Eat more. Really.

Weight Loss New and motivated, can anyone relate? Feb 05 2013
21:56 (UTC)
1

I've always used this site as more of an auditing type tool; I'll go for a week or two being absolutely fanatical about logging everything I eat, and that's usually enough to get me eating right (if only because I get tired of remembering to type in "grits", then "cheese", then "butter"). At the start, I did log all my activities as well, and it was helpful to see a consistent deficit. And I don't know why people apparently don't know about it, but the weight tracker is a wonderful tool. Weigh yourself every day at the same time under the same conditions, enter the number, and you will see your actual results plotted with the trend. Daily weight underneath the trendline == losing weight, no matter if your weight fluctuates (so 155, 153, 152, 154, 153 looks like it's bouncing around, but if you plot those numbers consecutively you'll see the trendline steadily moving down).

But to be honest, I still think the biggest change came when I started racing. Before, I used to work out. I'd go through different strength routines, cardio circuits, go out for bike rides, whatever. But when I decided to try a triathlon, I suddenly had an event on the calendar and a training plan to follow. The training wasn't anything killer, just steadily increasing swim/bike/run volumes, and even then, there were some times where I bailed early, or even skipped workouts. But race day was on the calendar, and I knew I had to at least start it.

So my recommendation to someone in your position is to find a local 5k about 12 weeks away, sign up for it (really - send in the form and pay the money), then get a copy of couch-to-5k and start following it. Because not only will you gain self-confidence, you'll show your daughter that you place enough importance on physical activity to do this crazy-assed thing. And even if she never wants to go running with you, she'll always have in the back of her mind "old-and-busted Mom can run 5k, why can't I?". And that's a good seed to plant.

Weight Loss Stressed about Calories Feb 05 2013
21:24 (UTC)
6

Karate and BJJ are pretty energy-intensive activities. Keep a close eye on your performance and recovery; my rule of thumb is fewer kicks == eat more calories, less recovery == eat more nutrition. And at 17, you're still growing; cutting out nutrition now means less health later.

Fitness 12 Week Body Plan... wha? Feb 05 2013
18:10 (UTC)
5

Well, you could try liberal use of I-statements ("honey, when you dismiss my arguments like that, I feel like you're dismissing me, and it hurts me. I'm really interested in this subject and I'd really like to argue these points with you in a constructive fashion. Maybe we can both learn something and have fun together!"). Communication, yo.

Fitness How to stop legs from being weak during morning cardio Feb 05 2013
13:47 (UTC)
14
Original Post by rachiesk:

Metabolicmom: I know strength will help which is why I'm doing the 30 day shred

30 day shred isn't strength training.

I'm guessing you're eating at an unsustainable caloric deficit. Not enough energy available means your body is slowing things down just enough so you're burning less than you think.

Fitness Couch to 5k - are you up for it? Feb 05 2013
13:40 (UTC)
5
Original Post by adioso:

week 2 day one of run . i jogged at pace of 7.5 kph walked 5kph and brisk walked at 6.3 kph.It did feel like jogging and i was trying to lean a bit forward instead of backward/upright . I just hope i can pull through the week at this pace. and half way through my mid soles started to pain. i have wide feet i don't know if that makes it more difficult for me to run ... i barely touched the 25 minute mark.

i came to realize most people walk at 7kph . i guess most people are thin :).

 

I am confused about the week 4-5 onwards. There are 3 workouts . are we to do all 3 in the same day?

 

Nope, do one a day on your normal running days. The first month is mostly acclimatizing yourself to moving faster than normal and figuring out your best run pace. Starting in week 4, you're probably able to progress a little faster than before, so each successive workout increases the workload just a bit.

If you get to the point where you can't keep running for the full interval, take an early walk break, and pick up where you left off. If it happens on more than one day, it's okay to repeat a week. But chances are, even if you feel like complete crap after a session, you'll be a lot stronger the next time you run.

Fitness I want a steady .5lbs a week gain with my weight lifting schedule Feb 05 2013
13:30 (UTC)
1

I'm an internet pharmacologist, dontchaknow. Rx: Take 3 sets of 5 reps 3 days/week. Front squats are nice, but you can carry more weight in a low-bar back squat. And check your routine. Are you adding weight consistently, or is it sporadic? Because if you haven't been squatting regularly for a year, you have a lot of room to grow. Which is nice for you.

Fitness Need better core/ab work! Suggestions? Feb 04 2013
19:50 (UTC)
6
  • warm up: 10 min on erg (rower) or stationary bike
  • barbell squat: 3 sets
  • barbell standing presses: 3 sets
  • barbell deadlift: 1 set

For each barbell exercise, warm up with 1-5 sets of steadily increasing weight. Maintain abdominal activation throughout the entire weight-bearing section. All sets 5 reps.

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