Forum Topic Date Replies
The Lounge You Feeling Depressed? Talk To Me! :) Jan 29 2013
04:47 (UTC)
1

Hi Mia!  well let's see...I have a lot I could vent about but that would take hours.  haha.  To start off with I am recovered from my Eating Disorders...anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and anorexia athletica....it's been about 3.5 years now which is awesome!  which means I joined this site that long ago!  wow!  time flies!  What about you...are you depressed?  Tell me about YOU :)

The Lounge What is wrong with my boundaries? Jan 18 2013
03:00 (UTC)
2

In my personal opinion the problem is you have no boundaries.

The Lounge Just wondering... Jan 18 2013
02:49 (UTC)
3
Original Post by lostpumpkins:

Let's say that your boyfriend/girlfriend had a "best friend" of the opposite gender.

And let's say you'd never met this person, but had heard about them.

Would you think it was appropriate for them to exchange text messages/emails/etc in which they called each other gorgeous/sexy/beautiful/hot?  What about if they woke up each morning and sent each other messages along the lines of, "Have a great day you beautiful girl/boy!"

And what if, let's just say, they made jokes about how they should get married if neither of them are in X amount of years?  Would that be a hilarious joke...or a rather inappropriate one?

And one if your boyfriend/girlfriend made not so awesome comments to this person about your relationship and your family?  Would that be ok?

 

(Let's also say that this is not about my situation.  Let's just say.)

I'm really sorry to hear this happen to you.  I know this hurts but the best thing to do is let it go.  Ask yourself what do YOU want to do now.  Which would hopefully just let him and everything go and cut all contact...phone, facebook..everything.  Try not to question WHY or WHAT IF...it will drive you mad.  If anything, move on and do it for YOU.

The Lounge Birth Control and Doctor's Opinions Jan 18 2013
02:03 (UTC)
31
Original Post by dnrothx:

Is it the doctor's fault she got pregnant?

I was gonna ask the same thing.  It's not the doctors fault she got pregnant. 

Secondly, if the woman wants to go on BC and the doctor isn't going to give it to her ...go to another doctor.  simple as that.  

There are risks with everything but what's worse is having an unwanted pregnancy.

The Lounge insomnia Jun 09 2012
06:27 (UTC)
3

I do.  prescription strength sleeping pills don't even help. :(  I really am at a loss of what to do.

Health & Support i am slipping the other way Jun 07 2012
11:34 (UTC)
3

tigal:

You will be fine. 

Most ED patients are not prepared for the phases they must push through.

The first phase is to eat 2500 calories a day, every day spaced throughout the entire day. Anything less and your metabolism remains suppressed and tries to hang on to what little energy is coming in -- but it's not enough to stop the damage, let alone heal it.

You need Leptin (fat/adipose tissue) as this is the determiner of reaching your optimum leptin levels which is key to proper weight gain, mentally and emotionally recovering from ED and plays a key role in hormones and metabolism. 

And ED person's leptin levels do not return to normal, whereas they do for the non-ED person. This is the critical reason why the low healthy range of BMI (18.5-20) rarely prevents relapse for an ED patient. The non-ED person will return to an optimal leptin level (that she had before starvation) of about 16. The ED person will have leptin levels of maybe 6-9, despite being BMI 20.

So while leptin is directly related to fat stores, the leptin system is now damaged in an ED person. She has to gain to the higher healthy BMI range to push the leptin back to normal levels. So she may need to be BMI 24-25 to have leptin levels of 16.

Why are those leptin levels so critical? Because if they don't hit about 16, then your period is unlikely to return (it can, but odds are against it). Leptin acts as a gating hormone for all the reproductive hormones functioning correctly.

More importantly, optimal leptin levels seem to quiet all those malfunctioning neurotransmitters in the brain. That means the chance of relapse is greatly reduced the higher up on that healthy BMI range you are (clinical trials prove that).

Your current BMI is low for a recovering anorexic.  As I have mentioned in posts, but we all need some reminding, a BMI of 20 (for example) will be a fully-recovered weight for only 2% of all patients striving to recover from the restriction eating disorder spectrum. That leaves 98% of those who have been told to stop gaining weight fighting the body’s absolute necessity that they gain more in order to reach their own optimal weight set point.

70% of all women naturally rest between BMI 21-27 and half of those will be BMI 23, 24 or 25 respectively. I fit in this category here...maintaining at a BMI of 24/25 after recovery. If you are meant to be BMI 24 and you are trying to stay at BMI 20, then the continuing damage from that ongoing restriction is equivalent to being naturally BMI 20 and trying to maintain a weight at BMI 16.

In that case, don’t assume that the excess energy will result in any increase in weight gain or that you will gain for forever. There is NO possible way your body will keep gaining. It will find it's set point. It is highly likely that additional energy is required for other biological functions and repair.  But if you gain to a healthy BMI of 24 (for example)  and then decide it's too much and then restrict again you are definitely setting yourself up for incomplete repair and relapse. You have to allow your body to reach it's optimum leptin levels. You haven't even given your body a chance to trust you!

Challenge yourself by forcing yourself to eat breakfast, a snack, lunch, then a snack and dinner then a small dessert.  Once you are comfortable with this you can gradually eat spontaneously and not feel guilty.  I know this will be hard for you (because it was for me in the beginning of recovery), but like with anything it takes practice and challenging yourself. 

As far as what to expect in recovery the cellular repair of phase I is much more likely to happen if the body is extracting the fluids from calorie dense foods and using the remaining energy to begin major organ repair at the same time.

You will have cravings in recovery as you eat more.-THIS IS NORMAL and YOU need to allow this to happen.  This is because your body is fighting your malfunctioning neurotransmitters. You need to listen to your body.

It is a mark of real success if you have many days in the first 4-6 months of 3000, 5000 or 9000 calorie intake in a single day and then dependably eat no less than 2500 the next day. That's a real significant win. So if you have eaten 2500 that day and still want a carton of ice cream then you eat the carton and remind yourself that you've just pushed your recovery up just that little bit more -- saving yourself with each extra calorie you take in is how you need to re-frame it.

Learn and try very hard to not be hard on yourself.  Forgive yourself and let go of the control of ED.  Learn to do the opposite of what ED would want you to do...like telling ED to take a hike after you ate something you felt like having!  Feeling uncomfortable is not a bad thing as ED wants you to believe...it's a sign of progress!

Stay strong...you will be okay.  hugs xxx

The Lounge Things partners do when they are together... May 05 2012
20:54 (UTC)
2
Original Post by jules817:

sometimes i'm perfectly happy to just hang out and watch tv/movies. it's hard to try to always be "doing something," unless you both have very similar interests. everyday life can be kinda boring sometimes, that isn't always a bad thing. in fact, i'd worry about my relationship if i couldn't be happy just doing nothing together.


thanks for your response.  it is good to know it isn't necessarily a bad thing.  we find enjoyment in doing nothing together too.   I just like to think of new things to do once in a while.

The Lounge Things partners do when they are together... May 05 2012
20:32 (UTC)
4
Original Post by knowan:

Original Post by armandounc:

Have sex?


Bingo!

ya we play board games.  we love doing that...but he doesn't like it too much when I beat him. lol

The Lounge Things partners do when they are together... May 05 2012
20:30 (UTC)
5
Original Post by armandounc:

Have sex?


well duh.

The Lounge Are you Addicted... May 01 2012
00:21 (UTC)
1
Original Post by loofahsaurus:

i tried to give up facebook for lent.... i lasted about 2 days. :[ i wish i would get addicted to something productive... like studying.

haha!  Same here.  lol. 

The Lounge The words "I love you" Apr 30 2012
08:35 (UTC)
1
Original Post by landislee:

Original Post by dancerqueen1:

 

Personally, I think those words initially said in a relationship are sometimes said too freely; and I say this from experience with past relationships, where they are said (by either party) too soon and/or out of pure lust. 

True.  The last relationship I was in lasted 9 years.  We said "I love you" way too soon.  And honestly, I don't think I every really did.  We stayed together because we had 2 kids.  I never really got that heart-floating feeling, it was all just young-lust.

Now, i've been seeing an awesome guy for a few weeks now.  I do NOT want to hear or say "I love you" for quite a while.  i want it to be 100% true and special :)

I can relate to that.  My previous relationship (before the one I am in now) he said the words I love you on the second date and he was very serious when he said them.   I was shocked and at the same time excited.  After the relationship ended I took a long break (by choice) to not be involved with anyone.  I look back on that and think how those very important and meaningful words were said too soon. 

I can honestly say that I know what the words I love you mean to me and I feel them for the guy I am in a relationship with now.  I know how he is when it comes to saying stuff like that because I was also the first one that expressed how I felt about him when we took our relationship from "just dating" to boyfriend and girlfriend. 

In a nutshell, he expressed he felt the same way but was shy about bringing it up and really didn't know how to approach it, which is fine with me because I am usually a very open and forward person. But, in this case, when it comes to more serious things such as the words I love you I want to be a little more cautious about saying them. 

I look at it as every relationship is different and some may say the words I love you sooner or longer in their personal relationship. 

I just honestly don't know when or how to say them to him.  I don't want to find the perfect time to say them, because in reality there isn't.  How did some of you that said the 3 words, approach it?

I have also read some stories on here that the woman said I love you first and then the guy waited a week-a month to say them back.  Did that at all make you anxious waiting for him to say them back?  I guess in a way you knew he loved you and was justing waiting to say them back when he was ready. 

Health & Support Still no period Apr 04 2012
19:13 (UTC)
3

Hello and hopefully I can explain some things and what to expect in recovery.

First and foremost, you are still at a very low BMI and weight for a recovery anorexic. 

There are a lot of things that come into play and having your period return while in recovery and not just a one-to-one ratio.

As you probably know having your period is extremely important while in recovery; but it does not mean the patient is fully recovered nor does it mean they should stop gaining weight.--having a period is a marker [among many] which indicates the patient is getting healthier.

There are also three key elements to consider and that need to be initiated to recover:  Leptin (adipose tissue: fat), and  hormones.  With these elements put into place your body will be able to work properly and repair itself, gain to a proper weight and have the hormones functioning properly; such as menstrual cycle.

In other words, try to look at the entire picture of recovery; not just having your period return [although it is a good sign]. Recovery is like a painting...you have to learn to look at the whole canvas of the painting and everything it takes to complete it. 

Realistically speaking in your case (and in most), you expect to have your period, and be recovered and fully repaired, after Anorexia and at a BMI of 20;  not possible.  This is considered a half-hearted recovery; a mediocre recovery. 

In some rare cases, those who are underweight and/or in recovery from an ED had their periods return--this is most likely due to hormonal imbalance and stress. Not allowing for a full recovery will cause permanent damage to your body and the repair will remain incomplete and set you up for relapse.

Gaining to a very healthy BMI is an important factor to recover and I will explain why. Leptin is one key element and adipose tissue (fat) is Leptin.  It takes hundreds and thousands of calories for the repair to occur and be at your optimum. 

So, on a scientific level let me give you an example of why gaining to a proper weight is vital for recovering ED patients even if you think you are at a healthy weight!  With that said, you want to have your period return at your current weight; not possible.

Let's just go through the process of an ED [and EDNOS] to show how it differs from calorie restriction for non-ED people just to give you a proper reference point for why you are being told "eat more", and then we'll get to some of the specifics of how your ED is shifting in expression right now with daytime restriction:

When you dieted for the first time some things that occurred in your body also occur in everyone. Your leptin levels drop quickly. With less leptin in the body, the metabolism is slowed and appetite is increased. When people diet severely, the metabolism is dropped as far as possible to try to maximize what little energy is being provided. While we can survive famine, it is at quite a cost to the body to do so.

Now this is where changes happened to you that don't happen to non-ED people. You had specific genetic mutations that were activated by that starvation. They primarily shift neurotransmitters in your brain to malfunction. We can see this on fMRIs with ED patients. This malfunction creates all the compulsions and anxieties around weight gain and food intake.

If I take two women of the exact same age/height/weight and I starve them (one has the genes for ED, the other does not) and then I stop starving them and I return them both to a BMI of 20 (exact same weight as pre-starvation), there are serious physical problems for the ED person that persist.

And ED person's leptin levels do not return to normal, whereas they do for the non-ED person. This is the critical reason why the low healthy range of BMI (18.5-20) rarelyprevents relapse for an ED patient. The non-ED person will return to an optimal leptin level (that she had before starvation) of about 16. The ED person will have leptin levels of maybe 6-9, despite being BMI 20.

So while leptin is directly related to fat stores, the leptin system is now damaged in an ED person. She has to gain to the higher healthy BMI range to push the leptin back to normal levels. So she may need to be BMI 24-25 to have leptin levels of 16.

As I mentioned before, your body will naturally find its happy weight and eventually you will stop gaining

Why are those leptin levels so critical? Because if they don't hit about 16, then your period is unlikely to return (it can, but odds are against it). Leptin acts as a gating hormone for all the reproductive hormones functioning correctly.

More importantly, optimal leptin levels seem to quiet all those malfunctioning neurotransmitters in the brain that generate the ED thoughts in the first place!That means the chance of relapse is greatly reduced the higher up on that healthy BMI range you are (clinical trials prove that).

First, has the definition of “weight recovered” been determined by experts who have helped you through your recovery process? If so, then it is highly likely that while you may have reached the healthy BMI range (18.5-25) you are still not at your body’s optimal weight.

However, BMI 20 will be a fully-recovered weight for only 2% of all patients striving to recover from the restriction eating disorder spectrum. That leaves 98% of those who have been told to stop gaining weight fighting the body’s absolute necessity that they gain more in order to reach their own optimal weight set point. Thus why it is critical to reach a higher weight to fully recover, prevent relapse and reverse all the damage done by the ED on a cellular and mental level!

70% of all women naturally rest between BMI 21-27 and half of those will be BMI 23, 24 or 25 respectively.

Your body will not be the same after you put it through an ED and therefore cannot compare your body to its pre-ED days. If you are meant to be BMI 24 and you are trying to stay at BMI 20, then the continuing damage from that ongoing restriction is equivalent to being naturally BMI 20 and trying to maintain a weight at BMI 16.

To give you an example: I went from being less than a BMI of 12 to then a BMI of 26 and naturally lost some of the post-ANA weight and now a BMI of 23. During the weight gaining I gained to a very high BMI--but as I built trust with my body and eating patterns and reached a full recovery I lost some of the post-Anorexia weight naturally and even to this day I consume the same amount of calories.

Everyones body will be different as you heal overall [not just menstruating again] and some need more. For me personally [after putting my body through Anorexia Nervosa, Exercise addiction, and Bulimia] I had to gain to a very healthy weight to have my period return and be regular and to be healthy overall and fully recover. Again, some[most] need a little more TLC to not relapse.

Remember, if you want to fully recover, and heal, you have to go all they way and be willing to do whatever it takes to do this for good and reverse all the damage done.

It was the best decision I made and so lucky to have my period after so many years of not having it but it took some huge challenges that I faced and I am so thankful for being fully recovered from Anorexia and Anorexia Athletica and Bulimia.  It has been 2.5 years for me and I am fully recovered now; but it took pushing myself beyond what I thought I couldn't do.

I gained to a higher BMI (which is recommended to fully recover) and it took some adjustment and getting used to.  But in the end it was worth everything...the tears, the frustration, the confusion, fear, and changes I faced.  I gained over 70 pounds...to a BMI of 26 (but I carry a lot of muscle, therefore I weigh more) and once I reached that weight and also reached my optimum Leptin levels, my body calmed down and stopped gaining.  Everything was becoming repaired and nsync and evening-out.  I maintained on that for a while and then lost some weight and now a happy and healthy BMI of 23/24. 

YOU also have to make an effort to be committed to change and recover as well.

I can assure you it is all reversible and you will be fine but it needs a lot more attention and time for awhile to ensure it goes in the right direction.

 

Best of luck and message me anytime. Remember to keep pushing yourself.

Please read these posts I wrote:

http://caloriecount.about.com/forums/health-s upport/period-five#8

and this...

http://caloriecount.about.com/forums/weight-l oss/period-44#6

Health & Support Please I Need Help!!! Restrict Binge cycle Mar 23 2012
07:53 (UTC)
2

You need to allow the "all I want to do is eat" phase happen.

Often too many patients stop gaining weight too soon and thus put themselves into the category of almost recoveries [also known as half-hearted recoveries]. If a patient cycles through almost recoveries that can lead to permanent damage in their adult life.

Almost do all recovering patients with eating disorders think (at the beginning at least) that they can maintain the lowest possible 'healthy' bmi range and/or when their period returns. However, this is a huge misconception!

The extreme hunger phase is normal in recovery and as long as you respond to the hunger and continue to avoid any restriction, complete recovery will be forthcoming.

If you are hungry then you respond to that hunger. The only thing you must remain vigilant over is the eradication of any restriction of energy intake.

Your hunger sensations will have a lot to do with where you are in recovery and having huge hunger sensations are a good sign; but not listening to them is not.

While you are in recovery and have those hunger sensations that seem out of control, by no means are you binging or overeating if that is what you are assuming. And when you do eat it is "reactive eating" – the body is reacting to dependable energy coming in by letting your brain know that much more energy is now needed to address repair and notch the metabolic rate back up.

The answer to this is and reaching a full recovery is to eat 2500-3000+ every day. Responding to any extreme hunger even when you are weight recovered or perhaps even beyond weight recovery is as critical now as it is all throughout the recovery process.

The repair will drag or be incomplete if the recovery process is sub-optimal (calorie intake below 2500 or calorie intake of 2500 with additional exercise on top).

Your functional leptin system will ensure that your body adjusts to its optimal weight set point and the excess energy must necessarily be consumed to complete the lingering repair and to finally push the metabolism back to its normal functioning rate.--Given you allow yourself to reach your OPTIMUM weight!

You have to know that when a person is gaining weight during recovery from Anorexia their overall metabolic and set-point and endocrine system is damage and it is NOT the same as someone who just lost some weight and gaining it back. There is a distinct difference between an ED-patient and an NON-ED person and how to get to reaching their set-point.

I really want to stress that ED is the one comfortable at an Anorexic weight and trying to justify it as being "okay"; when clearly it is not. I really want to impress the damage you have caused to yourself on a biopyschosocial and cellular level and this isn't to be taken lightly.

Your heart muscle is damaged. Your liver enzymes are shot. Your kidneys are very vulnerable to failure. Your hippocampus in the brain has shrunk (affecting working memory functions). The excess glucocorticoids in your body have inflamed all your arteries and blood vessels putting you at risk for clots and heart disease. Your muscles have atrophied and are prone to inflammation and tearing because you continue to exercise. Your bones are thinned and hollow and you are very likely to have serious stress fractures due to continued exercise at this time. Your skin can no longer repair itself, leading to dryness, flaking and outbreaks of acne. Your hair and nails are brittle and breaks easily. Your immune system is so suppressed that any cold that so much as passes by will hit you. Your digestive system is close to permanent failure. All the critical bacterial biome in your gut has died off due to lack of energy. Your gut motility is too slow, the concentration of liver enzymes (as I mentioned) is completely off. You can no longer produce vitamin A and D reliably. Your hypothalamic function is completely suppressed by both calorie restriction and excessive exercise leading to all the hormonal shut down resulting in amenorrhea. Your reproductive organs are atrophied, leading to vaginal dryness, reduced libido and sexual disinterest.

You can see it's a long list of repair and I've probably only covered off half of the elements.

Almost do all recovering patients with eating disorders think (at the beginning at least) that they can maintain the lowest possible 'healthy' bmi range and/or when their period returns. However, this is a huge misconception!

Getting up to a higher BMI (22 or above) is very important to ED recovery and being able to maintain on a sensible number of calories once you've recovered. If your body is meant to maintain at a lower weight, your weight will gradually go down (on it's own without calorie restriction or over-exercise). This happened to me and I naturally lost the post anorexia weight. Theoretically, this should happen to those who embrace a FULL recovery.

It is vital you give your body the opportunity to maintain at a higher weight, if that's where it needs to be for you to be healthy. Remember that being underweight can cause more than just osteoporosis from the lack of oestrogen. You're risking organ damage and brain damage. Just because you have a healthy body fat percentage and period doesn't justify you being healthy and healed.

I know right now you feel like if you give into the hunger you won't stop eating; but you will and learning to trust your body and relationship with food is KEY in recovery. You can't keep reverting to an "all-or-none" relationship with food. You have to know that because you have this relationship with food you it is because you have and still are starving yourself.

I also suggest you seek counseling and see a certified nutritionist-both of whom who specialize and have worked with ED patients.

You can fight ED and recovery is possible. I am proof of that. Stay strong and message me anytime.

 

Please read this post regarding hunger and recovery from an ED that I posted: http://caloriecount.about.com/forums/health-s upport/always-hungry-35#3

 regarding returning to normal eating:  http://caloriecount.about.com/forums/health-s upport/avioding-binges-returning-normal-eatin g

For further reading on recovery and what to expect...please read this post I wrote: http://caloriecount.about.com/forums/health-s upport/long-maintenance-intake#4

The Lounge I hate birth control pills! Mar 17 2012
21:02 (UTC)
3
Original Post by suzushii:

Original Post by dancerqueen1:

Original Post by loofahsaurus:

i absolutely HATED my pill. i felt so nauseous every time i took it. i am generally a chill person, but the pill made me extremely moody. i would cry over the smallest things and freak out if i felt the least bit annoyed. i felt like a bloated whale all the time and my face resembled a pizza. i got tired of being a fat, pimply, crying mess... so i threw them away. i'll take my irregular periods over that any day. :P


Amen!  I was on the pill for 2 weeks and hated the acne, bloating, mood swings and being a mess.  It was HORRIBLE!!!!!!!   never again.

You're suppose to give them 3 months for your body to adjust though. Not saying they were right for you, but they couldn't have produced acne in a mere 2 weeks.

Well they did.  Everyone's body reacts differently.  Now that I stopped taking them my skin is clearning up again.  Pills just aren't for me so my boyfriend and I decided on other options which seem better.

The Lounge I hate birth control pills! Mar 16 2012
10:39 (UTC)
6
Original Post by loofahsaurus:

i absolutely HATED my pill. i felt so nauseous every time i took it. i am generally a chill person, but the pill made me extremely moody. i would cry over the smallest things and freak out if i felt the least bit annoyed. i felt like a bloated whale all the time and my face resembled a pizza. i got tired of being a fat, pimply, crying mess... so i threw them away. i'll take my irregular periods over that any day. :P


Amen!  I was on the pill for 2 weeks and hated the acne, bloating, mood swings and being a mess.  It was HORRIBLE!!!!!!!   never again.

The Lounge I hate birth control pills! Mar 16 2012
10:35 (UTC)
7
Original Post by amethystgirl:

Original Post by asethi17:

Ok well I may be one in a billion ... But I'll say it anyways- why can't we all just not take any of this stuff and just be natural?

Because the side effects of pregnancy are often a lot less desirable than the side effects of birth control pills.

 

I was on birth control pills for over a decade. For most of that time, the only side effect I would get was mid-cycle spotting after I had been on a formulation for a few years. At some point, I switched to one pill that gave me severe mood swings. Subsequent pills lessened that, but I ended up deciding that I would rather be off the pill completely.

I'm more likely to tell people about my bad experience, but that shouldn't negate the fact that I was using bcp for about 6 years with only positive side effects (less acne, reduced mood swings, lighter periods, less cramping).

dancerqueen - everyone has different reactions to the different formulas. I generally hear people saying that they hate the depo shot, but if it worked well for you, maybe you should go back to it?

I think I will.  I am that case (1-2%) where what works for most doesn't work for me, and what works for me doesn't usually work for others.  haha. 

The Lounge I hate birth control pills! Mar 16 2012
10:32 (UTC)
8
Original Post by tlisseth:

You should try the IUD. I try to live as naturally as possible (often difficult in this day and age) but I definitely avoid pumping my body with unneccesary hormones.

Not sure about Mirena since it has hormones. The non-hormonal IUD is great, you don't feel it, no discomfort, no side effects (at least for me), no crazy mood swings, its good for 5yrs (just get it checked once a yr), and doesn't affect your body when you do decide to get pregnant. My mom used it when she was younger, took it out and was able to conceive immediately.

My argument exactly.   My body just does not do well with them either. 

The Lounge I hate birth control pills! Mar 16 2012
10:29 (UTC)
9
Original Post by asethi17:

Ok well I may be one in a billion ... But I'll say it anyways- why can't we all just not take any of this stuff and just be natural? I would think a million times before taking any of these artificial things and putting my body through the potential side effects. It doesn't seem worth it to me.

 

Trust me, I do not like added hormones either and our bodies hormones are already delicate.  I know there are some other women (like myself) out there whos body does not respond well to even the lowest dose of hormones in birth control. The only exception was the progesterone in the Depo Provera shot which isn't the same progesterone found in the pill. And yes the side effects of of most pills is horrible and enough for me to give up on the pill but not other forms of birth control. Like the IUD has no hormones, but does have side effects as with any BC; so there are options out there.

To be honest, and in a perfect world, going all "natural" sounds glorious but I believe in planned parenthood and do not want to get pregnant now and at the same time my boyfriend and I like making love the natural way (i.e. no condoms) - it just makes the experience so much more enjoyable.  So the best alternative is be smart about sex and finding another form of birth control. 

 

The Lounge I hate birth control pills! Mar 15 2012
04:01 (UTC)
28

they are horrible!!!  Horrible.  I don't get acne and the dam* hormones in the pills are causing acne.  And the cravings are ridiculous. 

The Lounge older women/younger men Mar 15 2012
03:45 (UTC)
1

One time I dated an older guy but most of my relationships have been with younger men.  My current boyfriend is younger than me.  What can I say I am a sucker for younger men and they love older women...so it works :)

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