lysistrata

Posts by lysistrata


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Fitness October 2014 Fitness Group All Are Welcome!!!! Oct 30 2014
03:51 (UTC)
21

NROL Abs Phase 2 Workout 1 second time.  I did a few modifications because I don't have a great system for the bands right now, and I skipped the metabolic at the end.  Warmed up with 5 and 3 sun salutations.

Valslide pushaways 10 per side

Mountain climbers 10 per side

Flexed arm hang 15 secs PR woot!

DB SS 3x8 @ 25

DB Rows 3x8 @ 30

WL DL 3x8 @ 80

OH squats 3x10 @ bar

Foam rolled, meditated, and cooked a killer stir fry with my pepper jelly.

The Lounge Liberal cities, illiberal policies Oct 29 2014
23:30 (UTC)
80

It's nice that they say so, but I can't help but notice they haven't actually done anything to make a change.

It also is entirely unclear that federal income tax policy has any impact on the availability of affordable housing in major metropolitan areas.

Fitness October 2014 Fitness Group All Are Welcome!!!! Oct 29 2014
22:49 (UTC)
24
Original Post by oldguysrule:

Original Post by crazineko:

Original Post by meganr:

I had one more workout left in NROL Abs Phase 3, but I was bored with it, so moved to NROL Supercharged (again).  Started at Basic 4, which was deemed OK by the authors for those who have been doing an NROL program for a while.

NROLS, Basic 4, Workout A

Dynamic stability:  side plank and row 2 x 10
Combination:  pushup and row 2 x 10
Giant set 4 x 10 - kind of weird rest scheme, you rest after every three exercises.  The fourth set I ended up resting after two just to even it out.
Deadlift, half-kneeling single arm cable chest press, single leg squat, inverted row
Note:  my range of motion on that single leg squat was relatively embarrassing.

Metabolics: 2 sets x 20 seconds each of: cable pullthrough, pushup, bear crawl, db 2 point row.  I could probably do a couple more sets of these so maybe next time.

Funny.  I'm going to be starting stage 4 next week sometime.  Looking at your choices, I need to try the pushup and rows and the SL squats.

For the SL squats I might try out the TRX for this.  Is this where your leg is out in front of you and you squat?  If so, I suspect my range of motion and balance would limit me.  Plus, I've never used the TRX for anything and I have been meaning too. 

I'm just thrilled to be moving along, really.  Lol.

If you have somewhere to attach the straps, you can buy rings w long adjustable straps for a fraction of what TRX staps (and their imitations) cost. Let me know, and I can give you more information. I got rings, plus adjustable straps, for about $35.

I'm interested!  I haven't picked out my squat rack yet but one of my criteria is that it have an overhead bar where I can loop some straps.

The Lounge Russell Wilson isn't black enough Oct 29 2014
22:33 (UTC)
24
Original Post by runesplendor:

Original Post by pavlovcat:

Original Post by runesplendor:

Your mother was a hamster, etc etc.

 

Not to derail too far, I spent a long time thinking about this thread last night, reading the FB walls of some of my cousins.

I think there's a lot of validity in the pinnacle theory.  The more I think about what I was reading, the more it fits.  I saw that quote too, Pav, but I never put it and this together like you did.  At the risk of turning it into another stereotype, it fits broadly across so many aspects (Like native leadership and reserve management) and it touches on the various issues that weren't always so easy to connect.

That's interesting, Runes.  I know it's probably a really complicated issue but if you feel like tackling it, I would be interested to know how you see it play out.

My gawd, I'd get an award for longest post eVAR.  Let me see what I can do here...

My cousin ran for a seat on council.  She lost by one families votes, because when some of them called her at 3 am for a ride when they were drunk, she refused.  Sounds like homecoming behavior, but they're all in their 30's/40's.

Elders talk a lot about kids getting educated so they can come back and improve things.  But you have to go off reserve to get an education.  When you come back, usually after 4-10 years depending on the reserve (some don't even have high schools), no one trusts you because you've been gone too long and you're out of touch.  You don't know what it's like, you're out there with white people living fancy at starbucks and you think you're so much better and smarter than everyone, stupid whitey beach.

Canada does it a little differently with Native kids in fostering; kids are kept in native homes even to their detriment.  I could foster kids and love them and raise them well, but because I don't have status or even metis and live on reserve, I'm not native enough.  So instead, they overload the few qualified native homes with more children than are safe (because unfortunately, native children are statistically at greater risk) and too many are dying in foster care.  It doesn't help with combating cycle perpetuation.

Residential schools did a tremendous amount of damage, systemically.  I'm only going to touch on this very briefly because a number of my uncles were in a residential school, and I know enough of what they went through.  But if you give every generation of a subset of people genocidal style abuses akin to concentration camps for 200 years, deny even to this day adequate resources to combat PTSD, addiction or even basic therapy, then take their kids away and lock them up unfairly (think of the criticisms of mandatory minimums in the US), there's not a great deal of personal growth that can happen.

What I see in my family is a generational record skipping effect. Women have children young and can't care for them.  Grandma raises the grandchildren.  Maybe as well as possible, maybe not.  Grandchildren face abandonment issues, addiction, until recently their own experiences at residential school, and end up having children very young.  By this point, generally Mom has straightened up and raises the great-grandchildren with grandma's help, while the grandchildren fight their own demons.  And so on, with little male influence or help.

I know that's convoluted, I hope it makes sense.  It reminds me of the cycle of high school, anyway.  There's more I want to say about the influence of residential schools, but I'm going to stop there for now.

Canada has always considered Natives wards of the state.  My grandfather fought in WWII, and his pay was sent back for him, because it was believed he couldn't manage his own money.  The Indian affairs agent was supposed to give it to Grampa's first wife, but she definitely wasn't capable of managing any money in his opinion.  That agent was corrupt and would not give her anywhere near enough money to support them. I think in the end, he pocketed a great deal.  Because of other Jerry Springer type dynamics, my grandfather's family wouldn't help her.  She had 4, later 6 kids to feed.  She turned to the shacking up type of prostitution in order to feed the kids and drinking to handle the shame.  Who would help a drunk squaw fight a government agent, if they even believed her?

When a group of people is categorically treated as lesser, with no responsibility, no trust, and no accountability, they never learn how to look after themselves.  They never are able to, much like the slaves.  But then, they're held to the same expectations as 'white behavior' with none of the resources or education.

Like teenagers - I expect you to drive perfectly like you have 25 years of experience but I'm only going to allow you to drive 10 minutes a week in a parking lot.  Don't eff this up.

So like kids, they group together in ways that either allow them to find a way to meet expectations or lower them.

I was trying to keep this brief, but it's just so big.  There's so many more ways I can see that the pinnacle theory could be an influence.

I'm so glad you posted this, Runey.

It's fascinating how many of the patterns are the same patterns we often see in the black community here.  Lack of male parental influence, grandparents raising the kids, kids find unhealthy ways to cope with anger and abandonment; cycle continues.

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
22:31 (UTC)
4
Original Post by runesplendor:

Original Post by catwalker:

I read a book once about planting food plants near each other that "liked" each other.

Carrots Love Tomatoes

I'm heterophobic.  Carrots should be with carrots and tomatoes should be with tomatoes.  Vegetables should only be having sex with their own.

Prude.  :P

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
19:44 (UTC)
8
Original Post by nomoreexcuses:

Not many people have seen Day of the Triffids. And even fewer have read the book.

I personally would not hail it as the greatest science fiction masterpiece of our time.

Never heard of it.

... I'm thinking the Sneetches might be a better use of my time.

The Lounge Outsourced corrections contractor Oct 29 2014
19:42 (UTC)
5
Original Post by dnrothx:

Original Post by lysistrata:

Original Post by catwalker:

I think privatization makes it worse. A private company really only cares about making a profit for themselves.

What do you think a government agency cares about?

The desires of the elected official that directs them.

*guffaws*  Not drawing the ire of the elected official that directs them might be closer.

The Lounge Outsourced corrections contractor Oct 29 2014
18:30 (UTC)
9
Original Post by nomoreexcuses:

Original Post by lysistrata:

Original Post by catwalker:

I think privatization makes it worse. A private company really only cares about making a profit for themselves.

What do you think a government agency cares about?

The Constitution!

We the people, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquility-eeee, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare a-and, secure the blessings of liberty, to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution, for the United States o-o-of America.

Exactly!  Definitive evidence for why there are no defense attorneys anywhere.

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
18:17 (UTC)
15

As far as the ethics go, until humans evolve to eat sunlight like plants, it seems pretty inevitable that we will continue to eat plants regardless of how they feel about it.  I do wonder, though, about how we produce and dispose of our food.  I'm already a fan of permaculture and planting in guilds, which basically puts plants with co-beneficial traits together, like a nitrogen fixer with a nutrient accumulator with an insectary with a food plant.  It does seem to make the plants healthier to have a good network - I remember shopping for fruit trees and noticing that the strongest and largest saplings were invariably the ones with a dandelion in the pot.  (Dandelions are nutrient accumulators.)

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
18:11 (UTC)
18
Original Post by meganr:

Looking at his Mycelium Running book in my case right now. 

 

Love that book!

The Lounge Outsourced corrections contractor Oct 29 2014
18:03 (UTC)
11
Original Post by catwalker:

I think privatization makes it worse. A private company really only cares about making a profit for themselves.

What do you think a government agency cares about?

The Lounge Outsourced corrections contractor Oct 29 2014
16:22 (UTC)
18

Medical care in the jail is an enormous travesty.  We've had two people die in the local jail here in the last couple of months.  One was a girl going through heroin withdrawals and went into cardiac arrest.  The other was a guy who had a heart attack.  Both of them buzzed for medical care and didn't get any.  We don't have a doctor on staff here, just a contract physician who comes in twice a week or whenever he feels like it, so any problem in the meantime is either ignored or, if the shift supervisor believed it's serious, sent to the ER.

These problems have less to do with privatization, in my view, and more to do with a lack of will to fund appropriate care in the jails.

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
15:13 (UTC)
38
Original Post by nomoreexcuses:

Original Post by dnrothx:

Original Post by santonacci:

I'm not sure how their experience would be significantly similar to most animals' - no sexual reproduction,

Actually, there's quite a lot of this amongst plants.  Pollination = plant sex.

pollen = sperm

Whenever I see that my car is coated in pollen, I kind of think, How rude...

But that's just how they roll. Kind of like those fish that just squirt their sperm into the water and trust that the little fellers will eventually find the right kind of egg to fertilize.

There we go.  We'll continue to eat them until they conform sexually and stop acting like such sluts.

The Lounge Russell Wilson isn't black enough Oct 29 2014
14:56 (UTC)
34

Well sure; but white people also say adios and sayonara.  I don't expect them to be viewed as Hispanics or Japanese anytime soon.

As a culture goes, hip hop is pretty cross racial, though.  Whites can get in, but it's tougher.  See Eminem.

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
14:47 (UTC)
43
Original Post by santonacci:

Original Post by lysistrata:

What do you think of the idea of plant intelligence? 

Well, until they start talking and singing, I'm not going to feel too guilty over chopping them up or cooking them - and even then, if they're agressive enough, it's just self defense.

I'm not sure how their experience would be significantly similar to most animals' - no sexual reproduction, no need to actively care for offspring, no ability for relocation that doesn't depend on another organism or the randomness of the weather.

What would plant sentience mean?  Just off the top of my head, a bigger gloibal hunger problem than the one we already have.

I don't know that anything would change in the food chain besides making vegetarians examine their principles a little more closely.  If anything, I think understanding more about plant communication networks could have a big impact on agricultural science.

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
14:42 (UTC)
44

Yeah, I always saw plant waste as compost, so totally OK.  Good even!

The Lounge Russell Wilson isn't black enough Oct 29 2014
14:30 (UTC)
36
Original Post by pavlovcat:

Original Post by runesplendor:

Your mother was a hamster, etc etc.

 

Not to derail too far, I spent a long time thinking about this thread last night, reading the FB walls of some of my cousins.

I think there's a lot of validity in the pinnacle theory.  The more I think about what I was reading, the more it fits.  I saw that quote too, Pav, but I never put it and this together like you did.  At the risk of turning it into another stereotype, it fits broadly across so many aspects (Like native leadership and reserve management) and it touches on the various issues that weren't always so easy to connect.

That's interesting, Runes.  I know it's probably a really complicated issue but if you feel like tackling it, I would be interested to know how you see it play out.

I know certain tribes down here don't give two **** about you if you haven't spent some part of your childhood on the reservation.  It's even part of their standard for getting involved in ICWA cases - a baby with some reservation history will be fought for, a twelve year old raised in the city, not so much.

The Lounge Russell Wilson isn't black enough Oct 29 2014
14:26 (UTC)
37
Original Post by amwick:

Original Post by lysistrata:

Original Post by amwick:

Original Post by lysistrata:

Have I linked the group polarization study before?  The one where people are more discriminatory about politics than race?

To me, it seems like economic class is something we mostly take for granted and race is a more conscious organizing principle.  Like maybe that's why we have hip hop and Nascar, so people at the top and bottom of the economic ladder can still have unity within their groups.


Finally, there is considerable evidence that group identity is heightened among disadvantaged groups, i.e. among women and non-whites.

It is more of an organizing principle if you are in the bottom of the barrel.  FYI I don't think Hip Hop promotes unity,, but I am old.

So it's all about red and blue, not black and white... interesting parallel

Hostility for the out party among rank and file partisans sends a
clear signal to elected officials; representatives who appear willing to work across party lines run the risk of being perceived as appeasers. 

 

eta

 

Oh, hip hop was a huge organizing principle for a while there.  I don't know how much of the east coast - west coast thing is still going on or if it's just all morphed into excluding Iggy Azalea because she's a white girl, but hip hop has definitely marked out a territory in which you belong or you don't.

... in a way, the only difference between the east coast - west coast thing and the political partisanship is that the partisans only dream about inflicting violence on each other.  :/

Hip hop may be organizing but it doesn't seem to unify.  It is promoting hip hop culture.  Because I am old, and clearly do not understand it, it seems one step removed from Gansta.  Just saying.  And Gansta is violent, the way I see it. 

Right.  It unifies within the group, though.  Those homies, they love their "brothers" like their family.

Hip hop culture is very oriented to identifying and policing the group orthodoxy.  You're supposed to "keep it real," or not get too influenced by success or new experiences, and you're never supposed to forget where you're from.  And where you're from is supposed to be an inner city somewhere; if it's just Toronto, you just end up getting your butt kicked by Chris Brown in some Florida bar.  Because you're not legit.

The Lounge Russell Wilson isn't black enough Oct 29 2014
14:15 (UTC)
39
Original Post by pavlovcat:

Well this is fun.

ANYwho.

I read one of those Humans of New York blurbs and was kind of astounded at the insight contained in this paragraph spoken by a black man:

Your brain is growing at a rapid rate during adolescence. There’s a lot of emotion, confusion, thrill seeking. It’s a time when you try a lot of things and make a lot of mistakes. We all went through it. But in this neighborhood, there’s not a lot of maneuverability. There’s not a lot of room for teens to make mistakes, and the mistakes have higher consequences. To make things worse, adolescence seems to be prolonged here. Many young people in the community view adolescence as a pinnacle, and not a stage. Girls become mothers at a young age. Fathers are absent, so young boys are forced to act like men. So what you have are adolescents who become authority figures, and spread the adolescent mindset through the community. Instead of thinking through a conflict, young men feel a social pressure to immediately react, so they don’t appear ‘soft’ or ‘weak.’ That’s one of the reasons I feel that mentorship programs are so important. They give adolescents a space to remain adolescents.

To me, that would go quite far in explaining the "crabs in a barrel" mentality.  Black people who "act white" have actually rejected the adolescent mentality which causes those still stuck in it to feel shame.  Since nobody likes feeling shame, they attack the authenticity of the "top crabs" in order to justify their lifestyle and choices.

That's interesting.  And the challenge would be how self-reinforcing it is.

The Lounge The Intelligent Plant Oct 29 2014
14:12 (UTC)
48
Original Post by amethystgirl:

Makes me think of the quote:

I'm not a vegetarian because I love animals. I'm a vegetarian because I hate plants.

Little bastards think they're so smart!

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