Michael

Posts by michaelduff


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Forum Topic Date Replies
Fitness What (and when) to eat before/after cardio? Jul 29 2014
23:32 (UTC)
1
Original Post by wgallen1230:

I've just started to try and lose weight. So I have exercise and nutrition questions galore. I'll stick with the nutrition part here. I am type 2 diabetic. male, 5'7" 220lbs according to the gym my BMI was 35%. In Consideration of the amount of fat I am carrying how much nutrition should I be taking in prior to and after work outs?


While I would not dare to disagree with Melkor's geeky science, the reality is for any person beginning to train to lose weight, nutrient timing is a low order priority.

Total calories in < total calories out will suffice until you get down to where you are climbing on stage.  Nutrient timing then is a matter of how well can you can train with your pre-training nutrition.

If you are underperforming because you have run out of gas, then increase pre-training enough so you aren't underperforming.  That will then have to be balanced against your total daily calorie allowance.

 Also you can read Hierachy of Fat Loss and Exercise for Weight Loss.

Fitness Building muscle while maintaining aerobic capacity? Jul 24 2014
04:36 (UTC)
1
Original Post by jamesrbryant:

Thanks everyone, as aerobic capacity is a priority to football (AFL) I think I should work on it in the pre season and try and gain anaerobic adaptations in the off season (speed and muscular strength)


Junior AFL coach checking in.

Get your squat up - need that strength over the ball like Ablett & Judd.

Chins - lots of these beauties. Grip strength, pulling strength (biceps & back).

And running... lots and lots of running.  Long distances, interval, 20m's, shuttle runs, agility runs.

Here is the AFL's recommended programs.  Personally, I think running Starting Strength during the off-season is a better choice, then get yourself a chin up bar and do 'grease-the-groove' chins (ie. below threshold sets as many times a day as you can get in).

Good luck bro!

My kids are just below the real value for a strength program (U11s) but I will be starting my boy off on a strength program (set up like SS) over the summer holidays.

PM me if you think I can help.

Fitness Building muscle while maintaining aerobic capacity? Jul 23 2014
20:45 (UTC)
4
Original Post by jamesrbryant:

Football season is coming to an end and I want to start going to the gym 3-4 times a week working on Muscular Strength to try and gain some muscular hypertrophy. During this season I have done loads of aerobic work and I think I am at my peak aerobically. If I work on muscular strength for say, 8 weeks while also trying to gain speed which are two anaerobic fitness components will it be detrimental to my aerobic capacity? Because I was wondering of I could maintain aerobic capacity while gaining size or will I have to do one or the other? Thank you

It would depend on current status, your time limitations and what is the highest priority for you for the upcoming season.  If you are young (and I'm taking that you are), then you should be able to balance both pretty successfully.

If you are doing a 3/day novice strength program (eg. Starting Strength), then lift Mon-Wed-Fri and get your aerobic work in Tue-Thu (& Sat if you can).  You should be able to pretty well maintain your aerobic fitness across a couple of sessions a week.

Then getting closer to season switch it up to a slower anaerobic progression and greater emphasis on aerobic. 

Fitness Losing weight, keep as much muscle as possible. Jul 22 2014
00:51 (UTC)
1
Original Post by Pugs4Everyone:

I'm doing the new rules of lifting for abs. The lifting portion takes 30 minutes. Actually, the power portion (squat jumps or jump shrugs and medicine ball work) takes 10 minutes. Then its four exercise, clumped two at a time with as many sets possible for 10 minutes. That means 20 minutes of as many sets possible. So, I clumped the power exercise and the as many sets as possible and get 30 minutes. I don't ever go the gym without a plan or program that shows what I'm doing, I don't have enough experience for that.

 

Thanks for the reply. You seem doubt anyone could love running. lol I find it taxing, challenging but really, just plain fun. I'll keep my deficit around -400. That should be high enough to reach my weight goal and low enough I don't burn off all my lean muscle. 

 

Thanks again michealduff.

Ok, you are doing a program.  I would recommend sticking as closely to the program as humanly possible as the people who wrote it know about fat loss.

Many times people who say "I lift weights for 45 mins" then proceed to list all the machines they sit on during that 45 mins that may or may not contribute to their goals but they have been prescribed by the guy/gal who otherwise unlocks lockers that people have forgotten their code.

Fitness Losing weight, keep as much muscle as possible. Jul 21 2014
22:22 (UTC)
5
Original Post by Pugs4Everyone:

I want to lose about 3 pounds in the next four weeks. I've got my calorie deficit to around 400. But....how can I keep the lean muscle I have (or as much as possible)? I lift weights 30 minutes 3 days a week, run a couple miles and then run 5 miles 2 days a week. The other two days are walking days. I'm keeping my protein up as much as possible. I have to admit, my favorite cardio is steady state.....but not low or moderate intensity, I keep my hr around 150-160. I know cardio can eat muscle but I love running. Any advice on keeping my body out of a catabolic state as much as possible? 

Edit: Also, if I do lose a pound of lean mass, how easy is it to get back with proper lifting and diet?

Your size is dependent of what you put in your gob.  After that its all about really knowing your goals and prioritising them.

If you "love" your LSS "cardio" (ie. running) then do it.  Its effects are going to be minimal , just make sure you aren't in a large calorie deficit.

Whenever I see someone say they "I lift weights for X time..." it makes me wonder what they are really doing.  Rarely do I see this phraseology used by someone using a proper (efficient) program.

 

Fitness not loosing weight due to excersize Jul 21 2014
20:51 (UTC)
1
Original Post by dee1973:

ok.. so I am aware that when we work out we dont really see the scale go down sometimes....

Im a scale whore... I like the number on the scale to go lower... I know your clothes can fit better and you loose inches even if the scale doesnt move sometimes.

that being said.. my question is...

if you do cardio or weight train... will the scale eventually move? if you are earing wright and excersizing on a daily bases.??

 

thanks for you help in advance :-)

Diet for weight loss; exercise choice for body composition.

Fitness What should a fat loss lifting program look like? Jul 16 2014
20:56 (UTC)
7
Original Post by syc212:

Thanks, everyone! The majority of what I understand about lifting has been gleaned from this forum and I think I just needed to hear it again, especially since I haven't had a goal of fat loss before. 

I was feeling kind of stuck, and a little unsure of what I needed to do. I have been paying attention to what kinds of foods I am eating, and trying to follow a 40/30/30 macronutrient ratio (which has worked well for me before). However, I tend to let that go on the weekends. I also have been lost with my lifting routine, a little unsure of what kind of program is best for me. I feel comfortable with my cardio... I run and bike on the weekends and go to cardio classes every now and then for fun. 

Obviously I need to continue eating well over the weekend. I think I am going to go back to a 3-4 day, full-body strength program (unless anyone wants to chime in on the merits of splits vs full body?). I can realistically go to the gym 3-4 times per week.

I feel like I have a much better grasp of what I should be doing and I am feeling much more excited and encouraged. Thank you all so much for the feedback!!


"You could have a novice pick their nose vigorously 3 times/week and they'll get stronger." - Greg Everett

As with every, "it depends".

If you are wanting to get stronger, then pick a strength program.

If you want to get more muscular and you aren't very strong, then (for efficiency sake) pick a strength program.

If you are wanting to maintain some muscle while losing weight and "enjoying" your program, then a NROL or the such would fill the bill. 

If you want to get more muscular, and you are all ready strong, then you should know the answer.

Fitness What should a fat loss lifting program look like? Jul 16 2014
20:43 (UTC)
8
Original Post by littlesimongeorge:

In short, lifting for cutting is the same as lifting for bulking.

 

Diet is the variable you need to change not the training.


I'm not reading that **** man... cliffs?

Fitness What should a fat loss lifting program look like? Jul 16 2014
02:45 (UTC)
13
Original Post by dakatz:

I can see why people mistakenly assume that higher rep weight lifting is better for losing fat, since they likely think that higher rep lifting means you are burning more calories and staying more active.  But this is incorrect for a few reasons.

Whether you lose weight or not is entirely a product of your calorie deficit.  Without a deficit, you won't lose weight regardless of your rep scheme.  Achieving a calorie deficit comes through a combo of nutritional choices and exercise.  Yes, lifting higher rep burns some more calories, which may make it a bit easier to a deficit, but weight training isn't your only tool for getting into a deficit.  You can also manipulate your nutritional choices, you can do some cardio, etc. 

Think about what happens to muscle while trying to lose fat.  The goal is not to build new muscle, but to retain the lean mass you have.  The body will be just itching to burn stuff away, whether it be fat or lean mass.  You need to give it a clear signal that it should hold onto the muscle.  Lets say you were previously lifting lower rep for a heavy weight, but then switch up to higher rep with less weight.  Well, your body will be searching for something to burn away, and it no longer needs that marginal bit of muscle that allows you to lift the heavier weight since you are no longer actually lifting it.

In fact, a fat loss period is the PERFECT time for lower rep, higher weight training.  True, you likely won't gain much strength (and may actually lose some), but it will help maintain as much of your lean mass as possible, since your body is still working at essentially the same maximums it was working it before you started losing. 

Bottom line: During a fat loss period, create the deficit elsewhere, not by turning your weight training into a cardio session.  Yes, keep the intensity high, but keep the weight heavy.  You want to MAINTAIN the lean mass you worked so hard to build.

I'm in general agreement with this.

My only point would be that there is a general perception of "losing strength" while losing weight.

In my experience (both personally and looking at hundreds of logs) is that in most novice/intermediate lifters, the loss of strength is either too large a deficit (in which case you are left under recovered) or it is psychological.  This is especially the case if you are carrying a higher level of fat.

This is coupled with the fact that if you are a novice/intermediate lifter (and want to see results as efficiently as possible), you will see better results from a strength program rather than a hypertrophy program. 

Fitness Muscle gain/ Tone.. help! Jun 30 2014
20:49 (UTC)
3
Original Post by floggingsully:

Original Post by kevinatthebrook:

I gave my son this exact same speech this weekend. I told him if he's not eating 4,000 calories a day he's not trying.

I would ask this question though: After he's met his nutritional requirements what impact does the quality of the remainder of his food have on results?

Let's say he weighs 165, is getting 165 grams of protein as well plenty of carbs and fat. At some point is it just eating for the sake of calories?

If he meets his nutritional needs at 3,000 calories can he eat 1,000 worth of cake?

 John Berardi (who's got a Phd in nutrition or something related, and consults with some Canadian Olympic teams) says he gives his athletes targets to hit every day (X grams of protein, Y servings of vegetables, etc) and once they hit those he doesn't care what else they eat to their total calorie goal.

#iifym...

I agree with Scrapper... the danger is pyschological rather than physical.  Sugar is damn addictive.

When my brother was trying to be a professional football, they needed him to add 10kg while busting his a** on the training paddock.  He was told that every time he got in his car to go anywhere he was to go through Mickey D's drive through for a quarter pounder.  He failed and now walks around ~150lbs and drives heavy machinery.

Fitness weight routine under an hour per session Jun 22 2014
23:59 (UTC)
2

It really depends on your goals, your current status and how many days you want to be at the gym but if you are still a strength novice you could go with something as simple as squat, press, row and leave.

Pavel's Power to the People is simply deadlift and press - a top set of five and then a back off set of five at -10% of the top set.

I think a lot of programs add in stuff to give people a feeling of having #beastmode.

 

Fitness Deadlift - how's my form? Jun 11 2014
21:54 (UTC)
7
Original Post by arroki:

It maybe hard for you but it's not hard for me, and it might not be so hard for her either. So effectively, you're just going by either your weaknesses or an advice given to you by others who have have that weakness, which you're then passing off. Rather than work with her strengths you just invoke a weakness. That's so typical of people giving advice on the internet.

Did you not watch the video or are you just one of those internet advice givers?

Without wanting to diss OPie (who has gone missing btw... OPie comeback we love you), she wasn't very tight in the first rep and got less tight each rep. Every rep was different.

 

Fitness Deadlift - how's my form? Jun 11 2014
01:26 (UTC)
13

OPie should use deadstop to ensure she is getting tight for every rep.  Its hard enough getting tight when you start but even more difficult if you are t'n'ging.

Once you learn to get tight and stay tight, then there is a place for t'n'g.

Fitness Deadlift - how's my form? Jun 10 2014
20:57 (UTC)
15
Original Post by arroki:

You've answered your own question there. It's not exactly some kind of special technique you can do only if you're advanced either.

Besides, you teach people how to lift using cues, and they were all there. Well done, Gloria! :)


Did someone delete the post where it was advised that t'n'g should only be used by advanced lifters?

Was there any other information in the missing post that was interesting?

Fitness Deadlift - how's my form? Jun 10 2014
02:49 (UTC)
27

Just some tweeks:

  • I wouldn't touch 'n' go until you get more experienced.  You can see your form change from rep to rep. 
  • Before you start the pull, you need to lock your shoulder blades, flex your lower back and take all the slack out of the bar (ie. pull until its all but lifted from the ground)
  • The deadlift is a hip hinge so don't think about where the bar is but where your hips are.  They should be pushed back hard before the pull (placing the tension in your hamstrings) and think about driving your hips forward.  When you commence to lower, again, push your hips back hard (that will stop the "tracing" around your knees).

Good work but.

 

*I didn't see the post above

Fitness Running and larger people! Jun 09 2014
23:15 (UTC)
10
Original Post by dbackerfan:

I have tried and tried to enjoy or attempt to "run" and it has always been a horrifically painful experience.  

I took a class at the gym and there was a LOT of running involved maybe a lap around the little building as part of the warm up and sometimes 1 - 3 laps in between other exercises and I just can't do it-   The fact that I have COPD and Asthma that makes breathing difficult sometimes is secondary to the fact running just hurts!!!

Even the book New Rules of LIfting for Life or supercharged said Running is an advanced sport seemed to give me the reason I was so bad at it.

Today I ran ( no pun intended) into this article and feel so much better about my dislike and why!

http://www.jtsstrength.com/articles/2014/06/0 4/minimizing-injury-running-considerations-la rger-athletes/

I am not an athlete by any means, but I am "larger" and excess weight with trying to run puts a lot of stress on the joints of the legs and feet.  

Oh and I found this article on http://www.theptdc.com/  "The Personal Trainer Developement Center.  Lots of information there for all sorts of things.

 

Why are you doing it then?

 

Fitness Obesity not Crossfit is the real danger. Jun 04 2014
01:20 (UTC)
5

Crossfitters sound much better on IG... especially female ones.

Fitness Obesity not Crossfit is the real danger. Jun 03 2014
20:17 (UTC)
7
Original Post by metabolicmom:

There's good and bad in just about everything.. But chocolate. Only good there :)

But the negative attention Crossfit is getting is taking away from facts that 1. The majority of crossfitter's do not get injured and the percent of people who join CrossFit stick with it compared to the percent of people that join gyms and then quit. If people think that's what cults do- then so be it.

I do not Crossfit- so to speak. My gym is Crossfit affiliated and I have done some of their metcon's on conditioning days or added some metcon's on to the end of a workout as a "finisher".. But I honestly don't see what all the negative fuss is about Crossfit. People get injured in all types of gyms everyday- does the risk of injury increase with Crossfit? I guess that all depends on the person -- and if they are being irresponsible and or pushing too hard too fast into their fitness.

I think the author, who is a dr., is stating that the real problem is not Crossfit or any program that gets people on the fitness train-- I mean- the amount of people dying from or a consequence of obesity far outweighs the decision to Crossfit- or run- or lift- or box or dance.. And so on.


It achieves the number one goal of Crossfit... talking about Crossfit at every opportunity.

Fitness Ladies - How much do you deadlift?? Jun 02 2014
00:39 (UTC)
2

Without seeing a video, I would suggest that it is likely in your head than in your body.

Also you are doing a lot of assistance stuff. 

I am a minimalist when it comes to assistance for squatting and deadlifting as it gets in the way of focussing on your core lifts (especially for those who aren't well into the intermediate phase).  You only have so many recovery funds to draw on.

If you are squatting and deadlifting, then apart from plenty of back work (which you should be doing anyway), I think a lot of assistance work isn't going to drive your deadlift up (and you've provided the case study).

 

 

Fitness Lifting weights? Jun 01 2014
20:44 (UTC)
1
Original Post by littlesimongeorge:

Start low, increase the weight each week by 5lb. 


QFT

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