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Calorie Count Blog

Should You Weigh Your Food?


By +Carolyn Richardson on Jan 11, 2011 10:00 AM in Healthy Eating

By Carolyn Richardson

While counting calories may seem like enough to reach your goal weight, many are deciding if weighing their food will be the added weapon they need to win the battle of the bulge.  It seems fitting that as you look to lose weight, you weigh what you take in, but is it worth the time and energy it takes?  As you weigh your options, consider how weighing your food may differ from other food tracking strategies.  
 
The Theory

The theory behind weighing your food has everything to do with what Calorie Count stands for.  By staying within prescribed calorie and macronutrient guidelines, reaching a healthy weight and body fat percentage becomes easier.  By tracking what you eat on Calorie Count, you are doubling your chance of losing weight.  A study by Kaiser Permanente's Center for Health Research found those who kept daily food records lost twice as much weight as those who kept no records. Keeping a food journal is one thing, but weighing food is a different animal, one that most people have yet to tame.
 
The Hassle

The opposition most people have to weighing food is the lack of convenience.  There is no shortcut to purchasing a food scale and weighing every item you eat.  While most will call it a hassle, some may say it’s impossible, and since pre-planning meals is usually a part of weighing your food, and you may feel like you don’t have the time.  But even if you’re a Mom with three kids to make lunches for or a full-time worker with a long commute, you can stick to the regimen. The key is in weighing it as you purchase it and then labeling your food.  For example, after buying groceries, come home and weigh fresh meat in serving-size portions and secure each in a freezer bag.  Keep a permanent marker handy to write the weight of the serving on the bag. Fresh fruits and veggies should be easy to weigh just before you eat them, but by keeping the small sticker on the fruit you purchase, you can write the weight on the sticker.  Before you wash it off and take a bite, you’ll see the sticker, and voila!
 
The Benefits

The case for weighing food is accuracy.  Weighing your food would prevent all the guesswork that comes with tracking your calories. Have you ever logged a food item according to what you think it weighed?  Some may think their measuring cup is enough, but the density of food is different for each item.  For example, a cup of pineapple is 5.5 ounces, while a cup of brown rice is 6.9 ounces.  Thanks to Calorie Count, you may be able to measure some things and convert them, but to get the number right the first time, use a food scale.  Check out how this little experiment on a sample of one revealed discrepancies in calorie counts when foods were measured instead of weighed.

The Cost

So you’re sold and you want to find the best kitchen scale for your buck.  But is weighing food cost-effective?  The answer may surprise you.  ConsumerSearch.com (disclaimer: owned by our parent company, About, Inc.) rated a slew of kitchen scales for accuracy, price and ease of use, and they recommend the best scales to buy depending on your specific needs.  If you consider that weighing your food and logging it may make you to eat less, and that buying groceries as oppose to eating out will save money too, then your food scale may be paid for in a couple weeks.  Your good health related to your weight loss will pay you back for the rest of your life. 


Your thoughts....

Do you weigh your food?



Comments


Weighing my food is how I was able to accurately serve correct portion sizes.  I would never have lost the weight without my food scale!



I have real problems with portion control and understanding what weights look like. I have started to weigh my food and it is now easy to see where I was going wrong! I was seriously underestimating what i was eating! So now I weigh and get the right amounts.



I weigh something almost very day!!! The scale has a permanent position on the kitchen counter.  Lost 22 pounds and counting!!!



I recently bought the Martha Stewart scale for 29.oo at Macy's and it has been a godsend.  I found that by measuring my food I am able to save hundreds of calories a day.  For example, an apple in the food log may be 2 to three ounces more than the apples I buy at the grocery.  It adds up.  I weigh all fruits, vegetables and meats.  Somethings I use the food log for, such as oatmeal and cereals, but I use a measuring cup for everything.  I do not eyeball it.  My eyeball is out of kilter when it comes to food and that is why I find myself in this situation to begin with.  My serving and a proper serving have never even been close!



I have to weigh and measure everything that I eat (or drink if it contains calories). I simply cannot control my eating unless I do. It gives me a precise way of knowing exactly how many calories I have taken in for each meal and for the day. A good friend got us a digital scale, which is the best thing I could have ever received from anyone. My measuring cups, liquid measure, spoons, and scale are always within reach. Since I do not eat meat, my husband prepares his meat portions for the freezer. He weighs each individual portion, wraps it well, places into a larger Ziploc bag, and labels and dates the outside. This way, he pulls out each portion he needs and thaws it ahead on a plate in the refrigerator. Yes, it takes time, but it is well worth it. He's lost 80 pounds since June. The last time I weighed at the doctor's office in October, I had lost 93. It will be interesting to see what the scale says when I go back in March. For now, I keep counting calories, and wait.


First lessions learned were to find out the differences in sizing the food.you learn discipline by measuring the food with the scale. often when you start your eys counts always different if you are hungry and you eat more. put it on a scale no choice. After three month I got used to the sizes of my daily food and I do not need the scale so often anymore. its interesting to find out what 100 g can be . 



You definitely must weigh your food! I bought a digital scale and weigh everything, it is the only way to be accurate in what you are eating, as portion sizes are smaller than you think. It takes only a few moments and is worth it in the long run. I have lost 37 pounds and have been thru dieting since mid November, and still weigh my food and count my calories.



Weighing my food has always been the best way for me to keep my portions where they need to be. However, at times I do not like feeling that I am a slave to my scale and ziplock bags. I try to really pay attention to what my healthy portions look like and feel like so I can recognize them when I eat away from home. After a couple weeks of weighing I become pretty accurate at eyeballing my portions, so when the scale really starts to bug me I take a break from it. Even if you just use your scale a few times a week for "portion training," it is worth the investment.



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I would have never lost nearly 100 lbs a few years ago without weighing and measuring my food and writing it in a journal.  I started July 1, 2006 and still write down everything I eat or drink during each day. Kiss

 



I just bought a scale and I'm going to be using it more often. One thing that's confusing to me. I was weighing some greens and it should have been 118 grams or 1/2 cup. What a weighed was WAY more than 1/2 a cup more like a full cup. I wasn't sure which measurement was the accurate one.



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I used to advocate weighing food and did it myself faithfully. I agree that it can be a useful tool in taking off weight, but if you have any obsessive tendencies, it may be best to not do this. I found myself unable to sit and eat unless I'd weighed my portions so I could know exactly what I was getting, and it took the joy out of sitting down to enjoy a meal. I've found a happy medium by learning to eyeball a portion and also using tools that are marked for measurement, but if I start weighing things, it can become a bad thing. Something to keep in mind for people like me!



Weighing food is essential. Yes, it is a hassle at first.  However, we tend to eat the same things over and over again, so once you have it down, then all you have to do is measure, which is easier. I put a measuring cup in with the cereal, a Tablespoon in with the raisins, and I bought a bunch of extra utensils so I have them handy.  I wrote down exactly how many grams are in one Tablespoon of walnuts, versus one Tablespoon of sunflower seeds.  It is different depending on the item.  Now I have made it a habit to always measure and it feels funny not to measure.  Only problem: eating out!!!

 

 

 

 



I love my scales!  I use my kitchen scale and measuring cups faithfully.  I weigh everyday.  My friend told me that was not a good thing to do as it could cause depression when my expectations did not meet my morning weigh in.  I found that when I weigh daily I know the minute I hit that plateau that is difficult to overcome.  I just overcame one that lasted a week!  I did it by recognizing it early and using my kitchen scale to portion down a bit.  Having been a baker I understand the value of weighing ingredients to get consistent results.



Weighing or measuring seems the only reliable method to count the calories; however, I am finding it difficult to do so while on business travel. This morning I reckon I had 2.5 eggs form the scrambled eggs serving dish. Maybe it was 3? I think I got 1/2c of strawberries, maybe less or more.



I really do not see it as a hassle at all, maybe in the beginning I had to get used to it, but it pretty much has become second nature now, my scale and my notebook never leave the kitchen counter.



My scale was essential for my weight loss and maintaining. I bought a digital scale with a flat platform for 15 bucks and it make weighing easy.  I put my plate on the scale, then turn it on. That way the scale starts at zero, even with the weight of the plate (or any other container for that matter). Then I add my food and weigh as I go, resetting the scale each time I add a new food item. It's just as easy as setting a plate on the table and serving it up.



My scale was essential for my weight loss and maintaining. I bought a digital scale with a flat platform for 15 bucks and it make weighing easy.  I put my plate on the scale, then turn it on. That way the scale starts at zero, even with the weight of the plate (or any other container for that matter). Then I add my food and weigh as I go, resetting the scale each time I add a new food item. It's just as easy as setting a plate on the table and serving it up.



Scales don't have to cost $30. I paid $16 from a tool company, 'something Freight' then found one at a over-stock, discount co. for $12. Bought it. And ~ it's the one I use. Look for stainless steel, moisture proof, and easy to wip clean.



Original Post by: bugirll

I used to advocate weighing food and did it myself faithfully. I agree that it can be a useful tool in taking off weight, but if you have any obsessive tendencies, it may be best to not do this. I found myself unable to sit and eat unless I'd weighed my portions so I could know exactly what I was getting, and it took the joy out of sitting down to enjoy a meal. I've found a happy medium by learning to eyeball a portion and also using tools that are marked for measurement, but if I start weighing things, it can become a bad thing. Something to keep in mind for people like me!


I totally agree... I was in a treatment center for anorexia and their principal was calorie counting all the way, which included weighing things. Unfortunately I got so obsessive with the food scale that I weighed everything, even stuff that comes pre-packaged. My suggestion: weigh what you need to at first, but try not to come dependent on the scale. It definitely becomes a crutch.



I think that weighing your food is the best way to accurately assess how much you're taking in. That being said, its pointless to weigh fruits and vegetables, I think the general assumption is that you can skip it since have 4 oz of grapes instead of 3 oz isn't going to undermine your weight loss efforts. I find it helps to weigh foods that can be deceptive because of the perceived calorie density. Nuts, cheese and meat are all things that just make sense to weigh. Especially cheese and nuts since there is usually a pretty big difference between 1 oz vs a 1.5 oz serving.



I've never weighed my food. I don't have a lot of money, and whatever I do get I am putting aside for the future. So I haven't bought a scale. I do my best with reading nutrition labels and following serving sizes... even counting out the amount of crackers in a serving so I know the amount of calories to log. The fresh foods that do not come with nutrition labels (like fruit and vegetables) I will estimate the amount of calories and then go a little above that, so even if I'm wrong with the calories I am still staying below my calories for the day by rounding up. I do the same with meal, I estimate by using the deck of cards rule.

I cook all the meals in the house, and I serve my own plate, so it is easy to measure and serve myself a smaller portion. And I don't like eating out, except for Subway (which conveniently had a book of all the calories in every item they offer).

I lost 80lbs by doing this and exercising, That was my goal. I have since placed my goal 5lbs away because that is the ideal weight for my height.



It's a good idea to weigh and measure, at least until you get an idea of what a serving looks like, so you can't fool yourself.  One of my favorite diet tips is about ice cream. The serving size is usually a half a cup, which may be smaller than a "scoop."  We all tend to want to underestimate what we eat, while overestimating what a serving is! 

 

 



I do not weigh my food, but I would love a digital food scale to know the oz of my meat/poultry servings http://fullbodytransformation.wordpress.com/



I was not convinced of anything by the artical written. It as normal never really stated a position. One reason I don't always bother to read these position papers.

However, the comments by the readers have made me at least consider the possibility of a scale. Thanks to all who are not fearful of expressing your thoughts.

Good luck to all.



I don't have room for a scale right now, but I've been following the rule for eyeballing portions, making sure to eat on a smaller plate (or fill only the center part of a larger plate), etc. I've lost 15 pounds doing that.

I tend to have more trouble with emotional binges or simple carb addiction (if I eat something sugary, the door is open for me to crave lots of sugars, bread, etc), so portion size isn't as much a problem for me as getting the extra snacking under control. But I've been paying enough attention to food for the last several months that I'm starting to obsess, and that makes it more likely that I'll eat when I'm not actually hungry, believe it or not. So now I need to back off a bit. Having a food scale would make that too hard to do, for my personality.



So, to weigh or not to weigh, that is the question of the day.

In my personal experience, weighing your food is better.  I started calorie count way back in 2006 at about 450 pounds. One of the first things I did when I decided it was time to lose weight was to go buy a digital scale. You do not have to spend a large sum of money to get a good scale. The one I purchased does pounds, ounces and tenths of ounces.

When I stated calorie count I just piled things on my plate and then weighed it. I was shocked at the amount of food I felt was an acceptable portion. With the use of the site and my scale, I started to understand portion sizing.  I feel that my ability to weigh my food and enter it daily into the food log was a key part of my success in losing 200 pounds in about 2.5 years.

Then guess what? I felt that since I had gotten to where I looked good, felt good and had lost this weight, I didn't need my scale anymore as I could manage my portions myself. Buzzzzz! WRONG! I stopped coming to calorie count in mid 2009. I stopped weighing my food and gee, I gained 50 pounds between mid 2009 and the end of 2010. I went from a waist size 36, then a 38 then a 40. Hmmmmm, how did this happen?

Well, as part of my new years resolution I came back to calorie count, I pulled out the scale, I talked to my girlfriend about my desire to lose the weight again. She agreed to join me in this lifestyle modification. She would like to take off the 20 or so pounds she has gained since she went from a job that kept her very active to a more sedentary office job.

In the first 5 days she was saying "why are we weighing everything?" "Why do I need this food log? "This is a pain in the #@&" I tried to explain it to her, and it didn't seem to click. I said to her, just let me enter your food log info, weigh your portions and make it easier for you. Well, at the end of her first full week on Calorie Count she weighed herself. Wow, she lost a pound and a half. She just kind of looked at me with a how did that happen look upon her face.  In that first 7 days she learned the real potential to weighing everything she was eating as well as keeping her log. Now we fight over who's going to weigh out the portions! LOL

So, I am a big proponent of weighing everything before it goes into my mouth (And long winded too!) but this is what has worked for me and is what is working for others.

 



How ironic this article shows up today. I ordered a scale through QVC last week and will arrive tomorrow. I debated over this purchase for many months but now that I'm using Calorie Counter I thought it a prudent investment.



@bentex1 Completely with you on this if I don't weigh and log everything then I don't lose. End of, so as far as I am concerned weighing your food is a great tool for weight loss.


I have two scales - one for home, one for office, and it is already making a tremendous difference.

My one question I am hoping someone can answer is whether you measure foods post cooking or pre-cooking? This applies, to meats, veggies, cereal grains, etc.

can someone clarify what is the correct approach?


 

scales can cost whatever you are willing to pay and $30 was within my means and a deal.  I do weigh everything, even fruits and veggies.  Since joining Calorie Count I have learned at lot about dieting and realize why it never worked for me.  Calories are not all that count.  Weighing the amount of carrots, apples (cored), grapefruit (peeled), helps me keep track of another important element to dieting:  nutrition.  When I began this journey I was so concerned with calories that I forgot nutrition.  Now, I not only eat the right amount of calories but also the important nutrition.  I read that the only way to lose weight is to burn more calories than you consume, and while that is definitely true, keeping you nutrition at the correct levels also gives me the strenght to continue.  It is indeed a lifestyle.



If you're on a weight loss plan, then to me this question is equivalent to, "Should I breathe?" And of course the answer is "Yes." And the $25 to $30 you spend on a decent quality digital scale will be money well spent. I have an older and crustier digital model that I use almost daily -- it's a wonderful aid. In particular, I use the TARE WEIGHT feature to zero out the weight of plates, other food items on the plate, etc.



I have found that using a digital scale has really helped me to estimate portions.

I found that with treats such as chocolate, ice cream and cereals I was eating far too large portions, but I also found that I had been cutting my calories far too much and underestimating portion sizes when I first started reducing calories without a scale. For me my digital scale prevented me consuming too few calories and continuing down a dangerous road to starvation.

I tend to measure everything including breads because often there can be an up to 20% difference in weights. One fruit loaf presliced had an average slice of 34grams but in the bag I pulled out one slice at 38 grams and one slice at 29. The only things I do not weigh are prepackaged chocolate bars, although I rarely eat them.

The other good thing about weighing foods is that it can often encourage you to make healthier choices. If you are the kind of person who likes bulk then realising that you can have around 300-400grams of steamed vegetables for the same calories as 2 pieces of chocolate is a big motivation to go for the vegetables. When I find myself tempted by something that I would consider a treat, for example a scoop of icecream, I always remind myself that if I eat that icecream I will have to skip an entire meal to compensate.



"Weigh and measure everthing I eat and drink!" I believe this is the answer to the question "how do I lose weight and stay on a healthy eating plan." Wow! I've lost 66 pounds since August 2010. I'm still losing seemingly effortlessly. I'm never hungry. I've found that what I previously thought was a portion is really 5 or more portions. Unbeknowst to me all these years my judgement and perception of the "correct portion" when I dieted--was "way off" that is why dieting was such a struggle--the results I achieved would reflect the inaccurate portions I ate. I believe this is the "Key" use it and stand still and watch the salvation of the Lord.



I own two scales as well, one on my kitchen counter and one tiny one for "away".  A good friend of mine, Elin, also on calorie count, made us each a travel kit for weighing and recording in restaurants.  It is a small cloth bag containing a small scale, small paper plates, a small notebook and a pencil.

When I order things, I ask for as many parts "on the side" as possible, especially any cheese or dressing.  When it arrives, I deconstruct whatever else I can and weigh and record the results.  Then I weigh out 5 to 6 grams of the cheese and sprinkle it on.  Then I weigh the dressing in its little plastic cup.  Note the amount, at the end of the meal I re-weigh the container, and subtract for the weight I actually ate.  Usually I use the "fork in the dressing" method of controlling the total consumption of any dressing or sauces.  It comes out at about 5 grams, instead of 8 or 9 grams when I pour.  I use the paper plate to weigh anything messy, and let the waitress clear it with the plates.  No one has objected yet in several years of using these dessert size paper plates.

I am like the fellow above who lost quite a bit of weight using c-c, then stopped weighing and logging for 2009 and into 2010.  In my case I had re-gained 20 pounds.  So I resolved to weigh and log my food again, lost 10, and then cut my calories some more, to 1300 per day, and have lost 12 more pounds.  Now I have only 30 left to reach my correct weight, and feel confident I can get there.

I like weighing my food, because I know my tallies are as close as possible to accurate, and that if I want a little treat, I can't fool myself about whether or not I should have one.

Early in our learning curve, Elin and I decided to learn to think in grams, and only weigh and record in grams.  It does make things easier, once you stop translating back to cups and ounces.  Sometimes we have to go the other way, and have memorized things like 28g = 1 ounce dry, 113g = 1/2 cup, most of the time.  Dry and wet things are a little different, but I rarely worry about that difference.

Our small travel scale is the Polder Pocket Sized Digital Scale, $20.13 at Amazon today.  It will weigh in grams or ounces, has a hold button and a zero,  or tare, button. 

Happy tares to you!

 

 

 



Wow! Impressive! amazing perseverance...good in both of you!Laughing



I'm working on weighing food. I am doing it more now after reading this article and the comments from you guys. I may not be religious about it right off the bat, but I'm getting there. Thanks for the support!


I'm actually trying to gain weight and using a scale is probably just as useful towards those ends.  I, however, do not, and because of this I find it hard to eliminate that last little pudge of fat around my belly.  But, just as important is balancing my weight lifting and cardio routine with my food intake.  Just before the end of the summer for example, I was using my bicycle as my primary form of transportation, had stopped going to the gym for a month, and I lost 10 lbs of muscle mass.  I am of the mind that weighing your food is taking things a little to far, although I have in the past.  I guess once you know how much of something looks like you don't really need to continue with it obsessively.  This site is a really good and easy way to check my meals content though=)  



I have a food scale and it has made my life an obsessive-calorie-counting hell!  I wish I could stop weighing and measuring food (I have already gone wayyy below my goal weight AND my recommended weight).  My dietitian is "weeinig" me off of the food scale lol.



Original Post by: aimmij

I have a food scale and it has made my life an obsessive-calorie-counting hell!  I wish I could stop weighing and measuring food (I have already gone wayyy below my goal weight AND my recommended weight).  My dietitian is "weeinig" me off of the food scale lol.


Hi aimmiji,

Are you saying that you got rid of your scale?  We hope so. 

Ultimately, most people should weight their food for a time, and then eyeball it, and make  periodic checks to see how they're doing.  There is a big difference between having to lose weight and maintaining ideal weight.  Unless you are actively trying to lose weight, you should not be regularly weighing your food.

Mary_RD



I like to weigh everything in grams, so it would be nice if CC would make this possible on all food entries across the board.

That said, yes, you really need to weigh at first.  Grams, and even ounces, are so much more realistic than "cups" or "tablespoons".

The most interesting thing about weighing is that the food I buy lasts soooo much longer because I am eating such smaller amounts.  I'm amazed at how far a tub of yogurt will be around when I am eating the correct portion sizes.  Now if I could just get my husband to weigh his food, we'd probably cut our food bill in half. 

So, to those who say they can't afford a scale, I say you can't afford NOT to buy one.  You will pay for it in less than a month with the savings in food, and less time at the gym because you'll have just that much less to burn off.



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I bought a very cheap plastic weighing scale when I joined CC. It costs less than a dollar, and quite small. I used this to weigh portions (oatmeal, rice, fruits, etc.)  Since it is quite small, I was forced to have smaller portions right at the start.  It really helped me lose weight.

So, buy any scale , even the cheap-o ones. 

 

 



I like weighing certain foods- cheese for example.  At 110 cal per ounce you can run wild pretty fast.  Eye-balling is okay for fruit and veggies but if you choose not to practice strict self-denial (a dangerous habit to start with) I've found weighing calorie dense 'pleasure' foods a way to have my cheese and eat it too.



Curlyb I like you're example. It seems pretty balanced which I like. I don't want to get to an extreme. Thanks for the tips guys!


I recently purchased a food scale as part of the 4 for 3 deal on many Amazon home appliances.  I bought three gifts for my husband and got a scale for myself for free!  I agree with others that it's important not to let weighing your foods take away from the enjoyment of eating.  But I've already learned a lot about what I'm eating, particularly with cheeses and meat. 



Hi everyone!! I have been following this discussion.  By reading what all of you write here, it helps motivate me to take the time to weigh my food. So thanks. ( I am retired, there is no earthly reason why I cannot do it.)

Question:  Is there a smaller scale on the market that won't take up so much room?  Please recommend.



Original Post by: carik1945

Hi everyone!! I have been following this discussion.  By reading what all of you write here, it helps motivate me to take the time to weigh my food. So thanks. ( I am retired, there is no earthly reason why I cannot do it.)

Question:  Is there a smaller scale on the market that won't take up so much room?  Please recommend.


I got a $20 digiscale from Wal-Mart that takes up virtually no counter space at all.  It has worked really well for me!



To: Aimmij, I agree with Mary_RD 100%. I can see that my obsession with over eating or gluttony might pick up another bad or hurtful obsession. I thank you so much for the heads up I will be watching with awareness because I have heard you and so many others facing the same weighing and counting calorie obsession difficulties.

I on the other hand am still needing to shed 109 pounds. Although I've come along way since 2003, once weighed 450 pounds, I would like to finally reach my correct weight for my height, age, body frame but more importantly a healthier and happier me. Because I sought a good dietitian this time around--she is not concerned with me losing weight she is concerned with me being healthy. So I am not watching or counting calories at this time. However, she did recommend weighing and measuring. And to my surprise on most of the box and packages the recommended portions suggest weigh and measure also. The surprise of all this is I can have anything I want as long as I keep within the recommended portion on all packages, weigh and measure all meats, starches, juices and follow/eye ball the portions for fruits--I have found that this is the answer I've been looking for all of my life--the obesity unhealthy fat is slowly melting away. I still cook alot at one time so I weigh and freeze everything--so most days I don't have to measure because it is done already. All I have to do is eat. When I go out to resturants I don't have to carry a scale--everyone is right about this--this is where I use eyeballing and jugement to eat what I know to be a portion of each food item. Because I don't go out to eat so often, I don't have to be so perfectly exact. Bottom line--I still lose weight. I'm not looking for quick results--at my age I'm glad, joyous and happy to get any results at all.

Oh! By the way! This miracle weight loss program, as I call it, has caused my stomach to shrink. I just can't eat a large amount of food at meal time. I get full too quickly. So when I go to a resturant and my mind tries to deceive me into eating too much--I just feel way too overstuffed with the first bite that is over the correct portion. So now it seems my internal mechanism that says "I'm full" has also been turned-on!!!

My comments are to encourage those out there who are like me that haven't caught on to this miracle weight loss program that really works. Although for the thousandth time of a healthier eating restart started in August 2010 I lost my first 50 pounds by using my old dieting methods that have always failed me eventually. Of course most of this weight loss was probably water weight. So I have only been doing the miracle weight loss program, as I call it, "weighing and measuring" since December 2010.  



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