subscribe Signup for our Newsletter expand Expand Browser
Calorie Count Blog

How to Use Visualization for Weight Loss


By +Diane Petrella on May 03, 2012 10:00 AM in Dieting & You

By Diane Petrella, MSW

Elite athletes routinely use visualization to improve their performance. But you don’t have to be an Olympic gold medalist to benefit from this proven, effective mind-power strategy. You, too, can create a confident mind-set and reach your weight loss goals more easily by practicing this powerful technique.

A recent study at McGill University reports that the best way to improve your eating habits is to not only create an action plan but to visualize yourself following through. Participants were asked to consume more fruit for one week. One group simply set the goal to eat more fruit. The other group set the same goal, wrote it down and also visualized carrying out the specific steps needed to eat more fruit. For example, they visualized themselves purchasing fruit and eating it at particular times. While both groups ate more fruit, the group that used visualization ate twice as much. This study supports the positive effects of visualization known for years by sport psychologists and peak performers.

What is Visualization?

We all visualize whether or not we’re aware of it.  Anything you’ve wanted and received in your life first began with a picture in your mind. Think of other goals you’ve accomplished. You created the vision first.  For example, you first held the image of seeing yourself in a particular job, or driving a certain car.

Visualization is the process of deliberately using your imagination to create a mental model in your mind. The mind doesn't know the difference between what is real and what is imagined, so when you visualize your subconscious encodes this new picture as if it actually happened. This helps you build confidence, keeps your mind focused on your goal and pre-paves the way for you to intuitively move in the direction of what you want.

A Basic Formula 

Follow these simple steps to begin using visualization to reach your weight loss goal:

• Sit or lie down comfortably. Close your eyes. Breathe deeply for several moments to relax.
• Now, picture yourself at your goal weight or a weight you can easily see yourself reaching.
• Notice the feelings and sensations associated with this image. For example, see yourself walking along a street feeling confident as you move your body with ease.
• After three to five minutes, gently open your eyes. Continue longer if you prefer.

It’s important to be in a quiet space with no distractions so you can calm your mind and relax your body. The more deeply relaxed you feel the greater your ability to internalize the images.

We all imagine in different ways. Some people are more visual, others more kinesthetic. If you’re unable to “see” a clear mental picture, that’s OK. Just get a sense of the experience in whatever way feels natural to you.

Connecting with your feelings as you visualize strengthens its effects. For example, feel that sense of confidence at reaching your goal weight.

Commit to a daily practice, perhaps visualizing as you lie in bed in the morning or before falling asleep at night.

Uses of Visualization

Here’s the fun part. Following the basic formula above, use visualization to “mentally rehearse” your desired behaviors.  Here are some suggestions:

Create New Habits:  As in the McGill study, visualize yourself eating more fruits and vegetables, or taking daily walks.

Problem Solving:  See yourself confidently managing challenging situations. For example, visualize yourself focused on eating your healthy lunch and disinterested when offered sweets in the office lunch room.

Emotional Eating: Visualize yourself successfully using strategies other than food when feeling overwhelmed. For example, imagine calming yourself by breathing deeply and then writing in your journal to release your feelings.

Goal Setting: Visualize wearing smaller sized clothing, releasing the next five or ten pounds or walking one mile on the tread mill.

As you become comfortable with visualization, you’ll be able to use it to not only lose weight, but to improve all areas of your life as well.


Your thoughts…

Have you practiced visualization to lose weight?

Diane Petrella, MSW is a psychotherapist and life coach. She offers her clients a spiritual approach to weight release and helps them develop a loving, respectful relationship with their bodies. Receive a free copy of Diane’s Seven Easy & Effortless Weight Loss Secrets by signing up for her monthly e-newsletter, Living Lightly, for spiritual insights and tips to release weight with confidence and love. To contact Diane visit www.dianepetrella.com.



Also on About.com

Body Composition

Read More »

Comments


Great article... positive thinking and visualization will definitely help you to reach your goals!



I guess I was doing this already and unaware of it. Feel thin, think thin, be thin. Pretty cool.



great article and of course easier said then done. i think by including PLANNING with visualization is the key here. if you visualize then don't preplan for example an entire day of eating or exercising you won't follow thru. i find that by combining both you can have success. after losing 21 poiunds i find this to be true. and also i find myself ALOT happier. thanks


While I absolutely agree that the visualization is an effective tool, I have some mild issues with it being touted as the tool of all tools.

I realize that nowhere in the article does it state that visualization alone will get you where you need to be; my difficulty stems from the fact that the implicit suggestion is that not using visualization is a failure because, tra la, visualization is such a fabulous adjunct that you will be successful.

1.  Visualization only works if you know yourself well enough that the visualization really is about your unconscious and conscious desires meshing.  If you are conflicted, as someone might be who uses their weight as protection against having to be more social, it not only won't help, it will make that person feel more like a failure.

And failure, of course, leads to the cycle of self-blame and falling off the wagon (or on, for those who actually need to gain weight).

2.  Visualization only works really well for visually oriented learners.  My daughter, who has an IQ that makes me feel dim, has a terrible time visualizing consciously, although her artistic ability suggests that there is some kind of visualization taking place somewhere.

3.  My picky icky brain is very tired of hearing how positive thinking saves all.  My mom's visualization didn't make her death from cancer less painful, my daughter's visualizations didn't make her tubal pregnancy a non-tubal pregnancy, and so on.  Visualization is one tool that may help, not will help.

Other than those issues, I think that yes, visualization is not unlike planning ahead.  When I plan ahead for the day and have an idea of what my meals will be, I am more successful, even if I make changes throughout the day.  Similarly, visualization can provide a touch extra oomph to your daily routine if you have 'visualized' and planned.

Apologies, I get tired of hearing visualization touted as the answer for everthing from anthrax to xenophobia.



Amen, I am in total agreement here.



OK - I just tried it - picturing myself at a healthy weight, doing different activities like exercising, working, going to a water park in a bathing suit happily. Felt good. I'll have to keep at it.



Original Post by: shearebliss

While I absolutely agree that the visualization is an effective tool, I have some mild issues with it being touted as the tool of all tools.

I realize that nowhere in the article does it state that visualization alone will get you where you need to be; my difficulty stems from the fact that the implicit suggestion is that not using visualization is a failure because, tra la, visualization is such a fabulous adjunct that you will be successful.

1.  Visualization only works if you know yourself well enough that the visualization really is about your unconscious and conscious desires meshing.  If you are conflicted, as someone might be who uses their weight as protection against having to be more social, it not only won't help, it will make that person feel more like a failure.

And failure, of course, leads to the cycle of self-blame and falling off the wagon (or on, for those who actually need to gain weight).

2.  Visualization only works really well for visually oriented learners.  My daughter, who has an IQ that makes me feel dim, has a terrible time visualizing consciously, although her artistic ability suggests that there is some kind of visualization taking place somewhere.

3.  My picky icky brain is very tired of hearing how positive thinking saves all.  My mom's visualization didn't make her death from cancer less painful, my daughter's visualizations didn't make her tubal pregnancy a non-tubal pregnancy, and so on.  Visualization is one tool that may help, not will help.

Other than those issues, I think that yes, visualization is not unlike planning ahead.  When I plan ahead for the day and have an idea of what my meals will be, I am more successful, even if I make changes throughout the day.  Similarly, visualization can provide a touch extra oomph to your daily routine if you have 'visualized' and planned.

Apologies, I get tired of hearing visualization touted as the answer for everthing from anthrax to xenophobia.


Dear shearebliss,

It certainly isn't my intention to convey that visualization is the one and only answer. Nor am I conveying that anyone is a failure if they do not practice this.

A powerful tool it is, nevertheless, when coupled with other resources and especially when guided by a skilled practitioner who understands the underlying unconscious processes that you refer to in #1 above.

I agree that not everyone uses their imagination in the same way, but imagery certainly is useful for those who have a hard time actually visualizing a mental picture. Those who are more kinesthetic, for example, and get the "sense" of the experience they are focusing on, will benefit as well. So for those who have a hard time actually "seeing" a mental picture, please do not be discouraged.

For those interested in learning more, please check out this wonderful book, Creative Visualization, by Shakti Gawain. While not specifically about weight loss, this book offers valuable information about using the power of your imagination to assist you in all areas of your life.

Warm regards,
Diane



  My problem with this if I see myself at my goal weight, It makes me feel like I am already there, I am getting relaxed and don't work as hard.



Perhaps consider how powerful negative self-talk is. Guilt, failure, and the conviction that we are not worthy of success is virtually always a guarantee we will not be successful.

Visualization is the positive equivalent of negative self-talk. Visualization may not cure cancer, but neither does negative self-talk cause it. My point is that negative self-talk is no less powerful simply because it does not cause cancer and positive visualization is no less powerful because it doesn't cure it.

Without the ability to visualize success, without the ability to neutralize that vicious inner critic, success will not be had. Show me a person who is powerful and I will show you a person who believed they were powerful well before they truly were. The single most accurate predictor of success is attitude and visualization is simply another way of describing a positive attitude.



Comment Removed

If you don't see yourself being successful then you dont think it's possible to be successful. You have to believe you can be successful in order to be. I think that truly believing is "visualizing" in itself. It's not a matter of just setting out to do something. I think we successfully complete goals when "we" see them as possible--when we believe that they are obtainable--when are ready to want them bad enough--when we believe--when we "see" ourselves accomplishing that goal. I think you can achieve this without meditating about it. After all. If you don't believe you can...you can visualize it til the cows come home and it won't happen. If you believe it--truly--then you "see" yourself doing it. That's just my 2 sense. That being said, some things we have no control over and we have to just do the best we can with what we are dealt. Positive thinking has different meanings in different circumstances.


You do NOT have to believe in visualization for it to work as long as you include the powers of your subconscious mind along with it. Your subconscious mind involves a well know law referred to as "Cause and Effect" (some people refer to it as the "Law of Attraction”) and there have been countless books written about this topic.

Whether they realize it or not EVERYBODY has had success with visualization. Let's start with Christmas. As a child, can you recall a time when you thumbed through the Sears Christmas Catalogue and "visualized" playing with that one toy that you wanted so very badly? Then you ran to your parents and -with great excitement- proclaimed what it was you were going to get for Christmas.

Christmas is just one example of visualizing that involves the law of "Cause & Effect". Imagining yourself driving that new car is another. Owning a particular home is yet another. Everytime we visualize something that we want in our lives WE ATTRACT IT.

However, it's also important to involve our minds at the subconscious level because that's what is used to create the experiences we want in our lives (like owning that new car). Don't know what the subconscious mind is? It doesn't matter. You just need to know how to use it. Our subconscious mind is what allows us to breathe without thinking and to blink our eyes without having to remember. Tapping into it and programming our subconscious mind to bring us those things we want in life is easy.

Here’s what you do. Before you visualize you should prepare some statements -also referred to as “affirmations”- that outline what you want in your life. Then as you visualize them you also say these affirmations to yourself. This connects your thoughts to your subconscious mind and sets in motion the law of cause and effect. You do this several times a day, forever. As time goes by you may also introduce new affirmations as well, or even change them.

One such affirmation may be as follows; “I am whole, perfect, harmonious, strong, powerful, loving, and happy.”

You can get more precise if you want by adding something such as this; “I am thin, healthy, I am free from illness and disease, and I am driving the car of my dreams.”

Or as another example, if you are suffering from arthritis (or anything) you could also say to yourself; I am healing, pain free, and will feel better and be healthier than I ever have.”

I have one cautionary word of advice though. DO NOT SAY NEGATIVE THINGS TO YOURSELF or you will “cause” the “effect” to be a negative outcome.

If this sort of thing interests you, do a search on Google for “The Power of Your Subconscious Mind” and you’ll discover books written about this.

Good luck to all of you!

 



Great comments!

Thought + Action = Results

And never forget that YOU choose your thoughts!

And you are responsible for your life.



I have done this very thing :) ... I decided that I wanted to be driving OFF of a car lot with a brand new car on a certain date.  I knew that I would NOT be able to do that with what my credit score was at that time.  So, I began the steps of correcting it and kept that date in my mind all the while.  One day I went to a particular car lot and started looking - the salesman saw me drive up in my 1979 Thunderbird and figured I was out to buy a new car - oh how right he was.  I wanted OUT of the boat I was driving :). 

Well to make a long story short I drove off of that lot (2 days prior to the date that I had imagined for a few months) in my brand new Mazda Protoge (that was about 15 or so years ago now). 

I intend to do this same visualization with my weight loss journey - it's just another very useful tool to be added to the bucket when it comes to this journey.  Anything and everything helps.

Angela



Original Post by: diane_petrella

Original Post by: shearebliss

While I absolutely agree that the visualization is an effective tool, I have some mild issues with it being touted as the tool of all tools.

I realize that nowhere in the article does it state that visualization alone will get you where you need to be; my difficulty stems from the fact that the implicit suggestion is that not using visualization is a failure because, tra la, visualization is such a fabulous adjunct that you will be successful.

1.  Visualization only works if you know yourself well enough that the visualization really is about your unconscious and conscious desires meshing.  If you are conflicted, as someone might be who uses their weight as protection against having to be more social, it not only won't help, it will make that person feel more like a failure.

And failure, of course, leads to the cycle of self-blame and falling off the wagon (or on, for those who actually need to gain weight).

2.  Visualization only works really well for visually oriented learners.  My daughter, who has an IQ that makes me feel dim, has a terrible time visualizing consciously, although her artistic ability suggests that there is some kind of visualization taking place somewhere.

3.  My picky icky brain is very tired of hearing how positive thinking saves all.  My mom's visualization didn't make her death from cancer less painful, my daughter's visualizations didn't make her tubal pregnancy a non-tubal pregnancy, and so on.  Visualization is one tool that may help, not will help.

Other than those issues, I think that yes, visualization is not unlike planning ahead.  When I plan ahead for the day and have an idea of what my meals will be, I am more successful, even if I make changes throughout the day.  Similarly, visualization can provide a touch extra oomph to your daily routine if you have 'visualized' and planned.

Apologies, I get tired of hearing visualization touted as the answer for everthing from anthrax to xenophobia.


Dear shearebliss,

It certainly isn't my intention to convey that visualization is the one and only answer. Nor am I conveying that anyone is a failure if they do not practice this.

A powerful tool it is, nevertheless, when coupled with other resources and especially when guided by a skilled practitioner who understands the underlying unconscious processes that you refer to in #1 above.

I agree that not everyone uses their imagination in the same way, but imagery certainly is useful for those who have a hard time actually visualizing a mental picture. Those who are more kinesthetic, for example, and get the "sense" of the experience they are focusing on, will benefit as well. So for those who have a hard time actually "seeing" a mental picture, please do not be discouraged.

For those interested in learning more, please check out this wonderful book, Creative Visualization, by Shakti Gawain. While not specifically about weight loss, this book offers valuable information about using the power of your imagination to assist you in all areas of your life.

Warm regards,
Diane


@ shearbliss: If one is determined to travel through life on their predetermined, unwavering and closed minded path, which I reluctantly will accept as fine if that is how they must be, I do so with the caveat that I will put in my two cents worth. If this is who they are and how they are facing life, then that individual will achieve and earn exactly what they deserve. Their reward will be no less than they want but most certainly will not include one iota more than their paths destination has been engineered to offer them.

You present several numbered points meant to contradict the facts and theorem mentioned in the piece. The sense is that I am assuming, you feel your points are proven fact, yet unlike the article's author, you offer no evidence or results from studies in defense of your personal feelings. At one point you try to wax professionally clinical but fall far short of achieving that by using the word "unconscious" where "subconscious" was the obvious choice to lend any credence to your statement. 

Your reply is chock full of closed-minded negativity and makes reference to several personal situations that include what even in your familial references seem as though they are simply you passing your own judgement in and around the circumstances. I offer my profound condolences for the loss and hardships you mentioned, and while my intent may seem harshly critical, it is not to meant to belittle or be insensitive to the gravity theses events hold in your life and the lives of others. I would rather that you see my thoughts as I intend them, to implore you to do as the article says...visualize. Visualize the alternatives. See that it is never too late to make a new start, try another approach, realize finally that change is good, an open mind is a healthy mind and can still be picky icky as it wants to be. There will always be room for your opinions and feelings, just remember that life is a complicated, varying road but that options are your friend more often than not.

Visualize the opening to your conscious/subconscious mind as the front door to a hotel...ALWAYS OPEN. If you've ever noticed, hotels never have locks on their front doors, they are open 24/7 much as your mind should be. This does not mean that you will always have a "VACANCY" sign out there, there will be issues, ideas, suggestions that your "hotel" will not have room for. The upside is, however, that you at the very least gave it a chance by virtue of the open door visualization. You might even find a room for what you thought would be an unwanted "guest". Instead, the opposite was in fact the case as you are impressed with the visualized traveler in such a way that lends you to think that despite your original assessment, you are able to make room for, open up to and accept the "visitor".

My parting shot is simple. Please give your mind the opportunity to make itself up. Enter life's challenges the same way you would watch potential guests enter that hotel, let the door swing both ways before you decide whether or not there is room for one more to stay. Above all make the decision to look at each situation from a positive point of view first. Help others help you. Honey versus vinegar, lemons versus lemonade, yes versus no. Open door versus closed and out of business. 

Give it a try. You may be surprised!



I love your example coffeecups2 (and your name!).

Of course visualizing a goal without DOING anything to achieve the goal isn't going to be successful. That would be daydreaming, right? BUT, how does one go about doing what needs to be done to reach that goal when surrounded by persistent distractions? For example, there are many things I'm good at but to have a successful career, I needed to be able to focus on one (or a few related) areas. The only way I was able to do that was by clearly visualizing my career goal. When tempted to practice a skill that I didn't need for my current career goals (and wasting valuable time), I pulled up that mental picture. Suddenly, all I could think about was practicing RELEVANT skills. It's like having somebody slug my shoulder and say, "Hey, I know that looks like fun, but that other skill is fun to practice too and here's a picture of what might be if you practice the second one instead of the first."

Visualizing is extremely valuable for focusing the mind. You are able to homein on the target like a laser, rather than haphazardly stumbling in the general direction of your goal.



@ shearbliss: If one is determined to travel through life on their predetermined, unwavering and closed minded path, which I reluctantly will accept as fine if that is how they must be, I do so with the caveat that I will put in my two cents worth. If this is who they are and how they are facing life, then that individual will achieve and earn exactly what they deserve. Their reward will be no less than they want but most certainly will not include one iota more than their paths destination has been engineered to offer them.

You present several numbered points meant to contradict the facts and theorem mentioned in the piece. The sense is that I am assuming, you feel your points are proven fact, yet unlike the article's author, you offer no evidence or results from studies in defense of your personal feelings. At one point you try to wax professionally clinical but fall far short of achieving that by using the word "unconscious" where "subconscious" was the obvious choice to lend any credence to your statement. 

Your reply is chock full of closed-minded negativity and makes reference to several personal situations that include what even in your familial references seem as though they are simply you passing your own judgement in and around the circumstances. I offer my profound condolences for the loss and hardships you mentioned, and while my intent may seem harshly critical, it is not to meant to belittle or be insensitive to the gravity theses events hold in your life and the lives of others. I would rather that you see my thoughts as I intend them, to implore you to do as the article says...visualize. Visualize the alternatives. See that it is never too late to make a new start, try another approach, realize finally that change is good, an open mind is a healthy mind and can still be picky icky as it wants to be. There will always be room for your opinions and feelings, just remember that life is a complicated, varying road but that options are your friend more often than not.

Visualize the opening to your conscious/subconscious mind as the front door to a hotel...ALWAYS OPEN. If you've ever noticed, hotels never have locks on their front doors, they are open 24/7 much as your mind should be. This does not mean that you will always have a "VACANCY" sign out there, there will be issues, ideas, suggestions that your "hotel" will not have room for. The upside is, however, that you at the very least gave it a chance by virtue of the open door visualization. You might even find a room for what you thought would be an unwanted "guest". Instead, the opposite was in fact the case as you are impressed with the visualized traveler in such a way that lends you to think that despite your original assessment, you are able to make room for, open up to and accept the "visitor".

My parting shot is simple. Please give your mind the opportunity to make itself up. Enter life's challenges the same way you would watch potential guests enter that hotel, let the door swing both ways before you decide whether or not there is room for one more to stay. Above all make the decision to look at each situation from a positive point of view first. Help others help you. Honey versus vinegar, lemons versus lemonade, yes versus no. Open door versus closed and out of business. 

Give it a try. You may be surprised!

 



Excellent article, and a lot of solid tips for such a short one. I would like to also recommend "tapping" eftuniverse.com offers free articles and all the information you need. 



As someone who has suffered through panic attacks, I can honestly say that visualization has helped me cope with massive anxiety. By seeing myself relaxed and enjoying an anxiety provoking situation, I have learned that I am capable of so much more than anxiety would allow. It is a lot like meditation, only focused on the pleasant outcome of a potentially uncomfortable situation. Visualization has also helped in my 60 lb weight loss: "eyes on the prize" was the banner on my cell phone until the day I reached my healthy weight! It takes time, and focus, but it is worth it. Just find a few minutes of quiet time and try it...



Original Post by: altsekdiet

  My problem with this if I see myself at my goal weight, It makes me feel like I am already there, I am getting relaxed and don't work as hard.


Dear altsekdiet,

I hope you don't mind my responding to your comment, but I want to suggest a possible reason for the problem you mentioned. From what you said I wonder if there is a limiting belief blocking you from enjoying success. Perhaps you believe you "have to work hard" instead of allowing yourself to enjoy ease and peace. Perhaps I'm off base here, but maybe something to reflect on.

A new belief, or affirmation, can be, "I am relaxed and at peace with my body."

I wish you well on your journey.

Warmly,
Diane

 



Thank you everyone for your comments!

I hope you all will use visualization for it is a practical and powerful tool to help you on your weight loss journey. We use our imagination all the time anyway, so my suggestions above merely help you take charge of your mind and mental pictures to support your progress.

Many of you offered great suggestions, thank you for elaborating on my article to help others. 

Warm wishes to all,
Diane



Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 



Again, I apologize for the typos....long week, bifocals, old person; you pick.

Capitalize "I" after Speech and English instructor.

The last sentence in paragraph one should read:  "I just have to look at a brownie AND I'll gain 10 pounds."

I give myself a C+ [ugh].

 

 

Is it Friday yet...?



Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


LOL!  I lost 60 pounds last year and I just turned 58!  It doesn't matter what your age is: what matters is your desire, and your level of commitment.  If your are using the words "easily" and "effortlessly" interchangeably, then you will certainly hit a wall.  But don't blame it on your age :-)



Wow, which poster am I responding to, as this is a duplicate.

You don't know me, of course, so the close-minded crack is pretty ludicrous.  As a writer with so much Irish and Scots that I sometimes have Second Sight,  and as someone who has gotten to third degree initiation, I am well aware of the power of Younger Self to focus our will and desire to manifest what we want.

I also know that since we aren't alone in the universe, our will and desire may not be the best and highest wisdom for us and for our immediate environment, so sometimes, no matter how vivid your visualization or the power of your Imagination or the strength of your creativity.

The chanting of New Age affirmations is well and good, and meditation and visualization, as I have experienced, can work wonders with anxiety, pain levels and other imbalances.   Creativity, visualization and imagination  are very powerful energies and yes, they can help you reach just about any goal--in fact, without them, you are unlikely to reach any goal.   They cannot, however, carry you there without other action. 

I can chant affirmation until I lose my voice, and if I have not reconciled my inner conflicts over whatever I am addressing with said confirmation, those affirmations will not only not have the intended effect, Younger Self may become so annoyed that the reverse effect occurs. 

We need Younger and Older Self, we need Shadow Self and we need Sunlight Self, and I'm sorry to say that until someone is walking on water and turning it to wine, visualization is unlikely to be the easy fix.

And for your information, despite the fact that my mom's visualization did not prevent her from dying painfully of cancer, my use of therapeutic touch, which combines imagination, chakra energy, and visualization, at least eased some of the pain.

Don't jump to conclusions, if you please.    



Diane, thanks for your reply.  We're not that far apart in our views on visualization; I've used it for therapeutic or healing touch, primarily, and it is a powerful tool.

But I'm afraid you had me until Shakti Gawain, for whom I have very little respect.  Nevertheless, I would second the recommendation on using Creative Visualization as a very good start to understanding the how to.

 



Original Post by: shearebliss

Wow, which poster am I responding to, as this is a duplicate.

You don't know me, of course, so the close-minded crack is pretty ludicrous.  As a writer with so much Irish and Scots that I sometimes have Second Sight,  and as someone who has gotten to third degree initiation, I am well aware of the power of Younger Self to focus our will and desire to manifest what we want.

I also know that since we aren't alone in the universe, our will and desire may not be the best and highest wisdom for us and for our immediate environment, so sometimes, no matter how vivid your visualization or the power of your Imagination or the strength of your creativity.

The chanting of New Age affirmations is well and good, and meditation and visualization, as I have experienced, can work wonders with anxiety, pain levels and other imbalances.   Creativity, visualization and imagination  are very powerful energies and yes, they can help you reach just about any goal--in fact, without them, you are unlikely to reach any goal.   They cannot, however, carry you there without other action. 

I can chant affirmation until I lose my voice, and if I have not reconciled my inner conflicts over whatever I am addressing with said confirmation, those affirmations will not only not have the intended effect, Younger Self may become so annoyed that the reverse effect occurs. 

We need Younger and Older Self, we need Shadow Self and we need Sunlight Self, and I'm sorry to say that until someone is walking on water and turning it to wine, visualization is unlikely to be the easy fix.

And for your information, despite the fact that my mom's visualization did not prevent her from dying painfully of cancer, my use of therapeutic touch, which combines imagination, chakra energy, and visualization, at least eased some of the pain.

Don't jump to conclusions, if you please.    


Oh, I think age has a lot to do with it.

25-30 years ago I could lose weight with no trouble at all. However, my metabolism rate came to a screeching halt and injuries/arthritis have done the rest.

Of course, your mileage may differ ;-)

 



Original Post by: hobbbs

Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


LOL!  I lost 60 pounds last year and I just turned 58!  It doesn't matter what your age is: what matters is your desire, and your level of commitment.  If your are using the words "easily" and "effortlessly" interchangeably, then you will certainly hit a wall.  But don't blame it on your age :-)


Oh, I think age has a lot to do with it.

25-30 years ago I could lose weight with no trouble at all.
However, my metabolism rate came to a screeching halt and injuries/arthritis
have done the rest.

 

Of course, your mileage may differ ;-)



 



Original Post by: goodspeak

Original Post by: hobbbs

Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


LOL!  I lost 60 pounds last year and I just turned 58!  It doesn't matter what your age is: what matters is your desire, and your level of commitment.  If your are using the words "easily" and "effortlessly" interchangeably, then you will certainly hit a wall.  But don't blame it on your age :-)


Oh, I think age has a lot to do with it.

25-30 years ago I could lose weight with no trouble at all.
However, my metabolism rate came to a screeching halt and injuries/arthritis
have done the rest.

 

Of course, your mileage may differ ;-)



 


Oh, I'm pretty busted up, honestly...cancer survivor (chemo and 2 bouts of radiation), bad knees, arthritic spine, PHN sufferer (nerve pain), so I know it's not easy.  But if I could get through all of that, losing weight was a walk in the park Laughing



Original Post by: hobbbs

Original Post by: goodspeak

Original Post by: hobbbs

Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


LOL!  I lost 60 pounds last year and I just turned 58!  It doesn't matter what your age is: what matters is your desire, and your level of commitment.  If your are using the words "easily" and "effortlessly" interchangeably, then you will certainly hit a wall.  But don't blame it on your age :-)


Oh, I think age has a lot to do with it.

25-30 years ago I could lose weight with no trouble at all.
However, my metabolism rate came to a screeching halt and injuries/arthritis
have done the rest.

 

Of course, your mileage may differ ;-)



 


Oh, I'm pretty busted up, honestly...cancer survivor (chemo and 2 bouts of radiation), bad knees, arthritic spine, PHN sufferer (nerve pain), so I know it's not easy.  But if I could get through all of that, losing weight was a walk in the park Laughing


Good point.



Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


Hi goodspeak,

Thanks so much for your comment!

We actually have a lot in common. I was an English major in college (always loved to read and write!) and I, too, am pushing 60 (sort of, will be 57 this year). So let's have some spirited debate!

Yes, I agree, words are incredibly powerful. And yes, for me, too, as I've gotten older in age (but not in spirit), managing my weight isn't what it used to be. Since our words are so powerful, I choose to support my spirit, and my body, by using words that help me create the life I want. And that means a life of greater ease and peace, even in moments of challenges and stress.

But I'm not sure that applies to the sentence you're referring to.

In the phrase you referenced above, I'm suggesting to people to not get derailed with the visualization process by trying to imagine yourself at your goal weight if that is too difficult. So when I said, "or picture yourself at a weight you can easily see yourself reaching", that could be the next five pounds. The point is to visualize what feels achievable.

May I offer a suggestion? When you say, "There ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age" I submit to you that this will continue to be your reality as long as you believe that. I invite you to entertain another reality such as, "It doesn't matter how old I am, I am capable of being healthy and fit."

As you said, our words have powerful meanings attached to them. What meaning do you want to give to your health and well-being?

(Please excuse any grammatical errors. Undergraduate school was a long time ago.)

Your thoughts?

Warmly,
Diane



Original Post by: shearebliss

Diane, thanks for your reply.  We're not that far apart in our views on visualization; I've used it for therapeutic or healing touch, primarily, and it is a powerful tool.

But I'm afraid you had me until Shakti Gawain, for whom I have very little respect.  Nevertheless, I would second the recommendation on using Creative Visualization as a very good start to understanding the how to.

 


Hi shearebliss,

Thanks for your reply as well!

The important thing for all of us on this forum is to simply move in the direction of what resonates personally as there are many diverse paths to the same goal of good health and happiness.

Warm regards,
Diane



Original Post by: diane_petrella

Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


Hi goodspeak,

Thanks so much for your comment!

We actually have a lot in common. I was an English major in college (always loved to read and write!) and I, too, am pushing 60 (sort of, will be 57 this year). So let's have some spirited debate!

Yes, I agree, words are incredibly powerful. And yes, for me, too, as I've gotten older in age (but not in spirit), managing my weight isn't what it used to be. Since our words are so powerful, I choose to support my spirit, and my body, by using words that help me create the life I want. And that means a life of greater ease and peace, even in moments of challenges and stress.

But I'm not sure that applies to the sentence you're referring to.

In the phrase you referenced above, I'm suggesting to people to not get derailed with the visualization process by trying to imagine yourself at your goal weight if that is too difficult. So when I said, "or picture yourself at a weight you can easily see yourself reaching", that could be the next five pounds. The point is to visualize what feels achievable.

May I offer a suggestion? When you say, "There ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age" I submit to you that this will continue to be your reality as long as you believe that. I invite you to entertain another reality such as, "It doesn't matter how old I am, I am capable of being healthy and fit."

As you said, our words have powerful meanings attached to them. What meaning do you want to give to your health and well-being?

(Please excuse any grammatical errors. Undergraduate school was a long time ago.)

Your thoughts?

Warmly,
Diane


Diane,

I get your point...and you're right about allowing negative thoughts to control one's thinking.

IMHO, the terms "easy" or "easily" make weight loss sound like a snap when it really isn't. I like the visulaization concept and I'm going to try it myself if for no other reason than to change my focus. For me, it is all about a lifestyle change and dealing with a body that is physically deteriorating. After years of being active in racquetball, backpacking, skiing and jogging I find I cannot do those things any longer. I now have to "love" the stationary bike and weights which, for me, is about as exciting as watching paint dry. No competion. That is my biggest struggle. How do I visualize a new weight if the competition I once participated in is gone? And competing with myself simply does not work; I need an opponent.

TBH, that is where the "easily" part comes in conflict with the reality. I can think it all I want then reality sets in. Make sense?



Original Post by: goodspeak

Original Post by: diane_petrella

Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


Hi goodspeak,

Thanks so much for your comment!

We actually have a lot in common. I was an English major in college (always loved to read and write!) and I, too, am pushing 60 (sort of, will be 57 this year). So let's have some spirited debate!

Yes, I agree, words are incredibly powerful. And yes, for me, too, as I've gotten older in age (but not in spirit), managing my weight isn't what it used to be. Since our words are so powerful, I choose to support my spirit, and my body, by using words that help me create the life I want. And that means a life of greater ease and peace, even in moments of challenges and stress.

But I'm not sure that applies to the sentence you're referring to.

In the phrase you referenced above, I'm suggesting to people to not get derailed with the visualization process by trying to imagine yourself at your goal weight if that is too difficult. So when I said, "or picture yourself at a weight you can easily see yourself reaching", that could be the next five pounds. The point is to visualize what feels achievable.

May I offer a suggestion? When you say, "There ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age" I submit to you that this will continue to be your reality as long as you believe that. I invite you to entertain another reality such as, "It doesn't matter how old I am, I am capable of being healthy and fit."

As you said, our words have powerful meanings attached to them. What meaning do you want to give to your health and well-being?

(Please excuse any grammatical errors. Undergraduate school was a long time ago.)

Your thoughts?

Warmly,
Diane


Diane,

I get your point...and you're right about allowing negative thoughts to control one's thinking.

IMHO, the terms "easy" or "easily" make weight loss sound like a snap when it really isn't. I like the visulaization concept and I'm going to try it myself if for no other reason than to change my focus. For me, it is all about a lifestyle change and dealing with a body that is physically deteriorating. After years of being active in racquetball, backpacking, skiing and jogging I find I cannot do those things any longer. I now have to "love" the stationary bike and weights which, for me, is about as exciting as watching paint dry. No competion. That is my biggest struggle. How do I visualize a new weight if the competition I once participated in is gone? And competing with myself simply does not work; I need an opponent.

TBH, that is where the "easily" part comes in conflict with the reality. I can think it all I want then reality sets in. Make sense?


Hi goodspeak,

I do understand. I used to run long distances but gave that up because my body just couldn't keep up that pace. Now I do a combination of strength training, Pilates, cardio (yes, boring), and yoga.

From what you said, it sounds like it's been quite a loss for you to let go of those activities you so enjoyed. My apologies if I'm off base, but if that's the case, and many of us deal with that, maybe you need to almost "grieve" letting go of the lifestyle and competition you loved so much to help you open to other activities that, while different, can still be enjoyable and fulfilling. (I'm sorry to sound like I'm in therapist mode, I just can't help myself sometimes!)

Anyway, if the word "easy" doesn't suit you, what about opening to this belief: "Even though I don't love using the stationary bike, I know it's healthy for me and I'm grateful for what my body can do." (This reminds me of a blog post I wrote about Judge Judy being my favorite work-out buddy because I get distracted with how mindless the show is!).

Our attitude is everything, right? May yours be filled with light and optimism.

Warm wishes to you,
Diane



goodspeak

You "thought process" in reference to your age and the ability you no longer have to easily lose weight is DEAD WRONG. The only thing holding you back is your "mind set"...

Until you change THE WAY YOU THINK that you will not realize your goal.

 



Original Post by: diane_petrella

Original Post by: goodspeak

Original Post by: diane_petrella

Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


Hi goodspeak,

Thanks so much for your comment!

We actually have a lot in common. I was an English major in college (always loved to read and write!) and I, too, am pushing 60 (sort of, will be 57 this year). So let's have some spirited debate!

Yes, I agree, words are incredibly powerful. And yes, for me, too, as I've gotten older in age (but not in spirit), managing my weight isn't what it used to be. Since our words are so powerful, I choose to support my spirit, and my body, by using words that help me create the life I want. And that means a life of greater ease and peace, even in moments of challenges and stress.

But I'm not sure that applies to the sentence you're referring to.

In the phrase you referenced above, I'm suggesting to people to not get derailed with the visualization process by trying to imagine yourself at your goal weight if that is too difficult. So when I said, "or picture yourself at a weight you can easily see yourself reaching", that could be the next five pounds. The point is to visualize what feels achievable.

May I offer a suggestion? When you say, "There ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age" I submit to you that this will continue to be your reality as long as you believe that. I invite you to entertain another reality such as, "It doesn't matter how old I am, I am capable of being healthy and fit."

As you said, our words have powerful meanings attached to them. What meaning do you want to give to your health and well-being?

(Please excuse any grammatical errors. Undergraduate school was a long time ago.)

Your thoughts?

Warmly,
Diane


Diane,

I get your point...and you're right about allowing negative thoughts to control one's thinking.

IMHO, the terms "easy" or "easily" make weight loss sound like a snap when it really isn't. I like the visulaization concept and I'm going to try it myself if for no other reason than to change my focus. For me, it is all about a lifestyle change and dealing with a body that is physically deteriorating. After years of being active in racquetball, backpacking, skiing and jogging I find I cannot do those things any longer. I now have to "love" the stationary bike and weights which, for me, is about as exciting as watching paint dry. No competion. That is my biggest struggle. How do I visualize a new weight if the competition I once participated in is gone? And competing with myself simply does not work; I need an opponent.

TBH, that is where the "easily" part comes in conflict with the reality. I can think it all I want then reality sets in. Make sense?


Hi goodspeak,

I do understand. I used to run long distances but gave that up because my body just couldn't keep up that pace. Now I do a combination of strength training, Pilates, cardio (yes, boring), and yoga.

From what you said, it sounds like it's been quite a loss for you to let go of those activities you so enjoyed. My apologies if I'm off base, but if that's the case, and many of us deal with that, maybe you need to almost "grieve" letting go of the lifestyle and competition you loved so much to help you open to other activities that, while different, can still be enjoyable and fulfilling. (I'm sorry to sound like I'm in therapist mode, I just can't help myself sometimes!)

Anyway, if the word "easy" doesn't suit you, what about opening to this belief: "Even though I don't love using the stationary bike, I know it's healthy for me and I'm grateful for what my body can do." (This reminds me of a blog post I wrote about Judge Judy being my favorite work-out buddy because I get distracted with how mindless the show is!).

Our attitude is everything, right? May yours be filled with light and optimism.

Warm wishes to you,
Diane


Diane,

Thank you for your comments.

Honestly, I think you are spot on with regard to losing the ability to compete like I used to. After 35 years on the racquetball court as a club player and tournament player, you have no idea how much I crave the opportunity to get back out there again...but my knees and lower back have other ideas. So, your suggestion of a kind of grieving process has not fallen on deaf ears. I guess I just need to suck it up and move on with my exercise routine and finally embrace the change.

And as you so correctly pointed out: Attitude is everything.

Thanks again,

Tim

 



Original Post by: goodspeak

Original Post by: diane_petrella

Original Post by: goodspeak

Original Post by: diane_petrella

Original Post by: goodspeak

Diane,

I really hate to be the proverbial fly in the ointment here, but you had me going right up until I read, " a weight you can easily see yourself reaching". That may be true for somebody in your age bracket, but I'm pushing 60. They ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age. Trust me. I just have to look at a brownie at I'll gain 10 pounds.

TBH, I like the general concept, but [and I realize you probably get cheap advice from a lot of folks] words have powerful meanings attached to them. It might be a good idea not to use such qualifiers as "easy" in your writings. Not that it matters, but I bring 30+ years as a Speech and English instructor and i can say with complete confidence: Words have tremendous impact and value. On a website where people only see the words and not your gestures or hear your tone of voice, they may get the wrong idea or worse, give up once they find it's not so easy.

Just sayin'. 

 


Hi goodspeak,

Thanks so much for your comment!

We actually have a lot in common. I was an English major in college (always loved to read and write!) and I, too, am pushing 60 (sort of, will be 57 this year). So let's have some spirited debate!

Yes, I agree, words are incredibly powerful. And yes, for me, too, as I've gotten older in age (but not in spirit), managing my weight isn't what it used to be. Since our words are so powerful, I choose to support my spirit, and my body, by using words that help me create the life I want. And that means a life of greater ease and peace, even in moments of challenges and stress.

But I'm not sure that applies to the sentence you're referring to.

In the phrase you referenced above, I'm suggesting to people to not get derailed with the visualization process by trying to imagine yourself at your goal weight if that is too difficult. So when I said, "or picture yourself at a weight you can easily see yourself reaching", that could be the next five pounds. The point is to visualize what feels achievable.

May I offer a suggestion? When you say, "There ain't nothin' "easy" about losing weight at my age" I submit to you that this will continue to be your reality as long as you believe that. I invite you to entertain another reality such as, "It doesn't matter how old I am, I am capable of being healthy and fit."

As you said, our words have powerful meanings attached to them. What meaning do you want to give to your health and well-being?

(Please excuse any grammatical errors. Undergraduate school was a long time ago.)

Your thoughts?

Warmly,
Diane


Diane,

I get your point...and you're right about allowing negative thoughts to control one's thinking.

IMHO, the terms "easy" or "easily" make weight loss sound like a snap when it really isn't. I like the visulaization concept and I'm going to try it myself if for no other reason than to change my focus. For me, it is all about a lifestyle change and dealing with a body that is physically deteriorating. After years of being active in racquetball, backpacking, skiing and jogging I find I cannot do those things any longer. I now have to "love" the stationary bike and weights which, for me, is about as exciting as watching paint dry. No competion. That is my biggest struggle. How do I visualize a new weight if the competition I once participated in is gone? And competing with myself simply does not work; I need an opponent.

TBH, that is where the "easily" part comes in conflict with the reality. I can think it all I want then reality sets in. Make sense?


Hi goodspeak,

I do understand. I used to run long distances but gave that up because my body just couldn't keep up that pace. Now I do a combination of strength training, Pilates, cardio (yes, boring), and yoga.

From what you said, it sounds like it's been quite a loss for you to let go of those activities you so enjoyed. My apologies if I'm off base, but if that's the case, and many of us deal with that, maybe you need to almost "grieve" letting go of the lifestyle and competition you loved so much to help you open to other activities that, while different, can still be enjoyable and fulfilling. (I'm sorry to sound like I'm in therapist mode, I just can't help myself sometimes!)

Anyway, if the word "easy" doesn't suit you, what about opening to this belief: "Even though I don't love using the stationary bike, I know it's healthy for me and I'm grateful for what my body can do." (This reminds me of a blog post I wrote about Judge Judy being my favorite work-out buddy because I get distracted with how mindless the show is!).

Our attitude is everything, right? May yours be filled with light and optimism.

Warm wishes to you,
Diane


Diane,

Thank you for your comments.

Honestly, I think you are spot on with regard to losing the ability to compete like I used to. After 35 years on the racquetball court as a club player and tournament player, you have no idea how much I crave the opportunity to get back out there again...but my knees and lower back have other ideas. So, your suggestion of a kind of grieving process has not fallen on deaf ears. I guess I just need to suck it up and move on with my exercise routine and finally embrace the change.

And as you so correctly pointed out: Attitude is everything.

Thanks again,

Tim

 


Dear Tim,

You are very welcome.

Warm wishes to you in your journey.

Blessings,
Diane



Original Post by: xozsted

If you don't see yourself being successful then you dont think it's possible to be successful. You have to believe you can be successful in order to be. I think that truly believing is "visualizing" in itself. It's not a matter of just setting out to do something. I think we successfully complete goals when "we" see them as possible--when we believe that they are obtainable--when are ready to want them bad enough--when we believe--when we "see" ourselves accomplishing that goal. I think you can achieve this without meditating about it. After all. If you don't believe you can...you can visualize it til the cows come home and it won't happen. If you believe it--truly--then you "see" yourself doing it. That's just my 2 sense. That being said, some things we have no control over and we have to just do the best we can with what we are dealt. Positive thinking has different meanings in different circumstances.

Great insight!!  Great view!

 



Original Post by: xozsted

If you don't see yourself being successful then you dont think it's possible to be successful. You have to believe you can be successful in order to be. I think that truly believing is "visualizing" in itself. It's not a matter of just setting out to do something. I think we successfully complete goals when "we" see them as possible--when we believe that they are obtainable--when are ready to want them bad enough--when we believe--when we "see" ourselves accomplishing that goal. I think you can achieve this without meditating about it. After all. If you don't believe you can...you can visualize it til the cows come home and it won't happen. If you believe it--truly--then you "see" yourself doing it. That's just my 2 sense. That being said, some things we have no control over and we have to just do the best we can with what we are dealt. Positive thinking has different meanings in different circumstances.

Great point, xozsted, that if you don't see yourself as successful and if you don't think what you want to achieve is possible, you cannot achieve it.

We must first see it in our mind's eye and feel it in our heart. Visualization helps bring your mind and heart together so your desired goal does feel believable. 

I'm not referring to the act of daydreaming a fantasy, but deliberating using the gift of your imagination to support you in reaching your desired goals.

I've seen people do this hundreds of times. Myself included.



Original Post by: altsekdiet

  My problem with this if I see myself at my goal weight, It makes me feel like I am already there, I am getting relaxed and don't work as hard.


I'd like to add something else for you, altsekdiet, and for others who feel similarly. If focusing on reaching your goal weight isn't as useful, use visualization, as in the study noted above, to create new habits and to see yourself successfully managing daily challenges. This often helps to develop confidence and eagerness around changing one's lifestyle. Hope that helps.

All best,
Diane



Good Article!  I'm 55 and just reached a 100 lb loss in less than one year. Still about 25 to go, BUT my point is that I am female, over 50, and all it took was a made up mind (which can be had by visualizing) and I got it done---easily. 

I did some visualization, not so much in the sense mentioned above but I did visualize/daydream about my goal . . . how many pounds would I need to lose to wear a certain size, what kind of clothes I would buy, what new habits I wanted to create.  I also pretended I was NOT that hungry, imagined eating/acting like a "naturally" thin person, etc.  

Visualization may not be the only tool in the box, but it helps us in all areas of life and most of us use it and don't even realize we are doing so.



I could swear this article is so true. I used visuallization before and it really worked. I lost then 33 pounds and my size turned 10.However, I gained more than 33 pounds after pregnancy but I am on diet now and practice the great visuallization specially when I am at my bed just before sleeping.


Post Your Comment

Join Calorie Count - it's easy and free!
CREATE FREE ACCOUNT
Advertisement
Advertisement