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Why Do You Really Want to Lose Weight?


By +Carolyn Richardson on Aug 03, 2011 10:00 AM in Dieting & You

By Carolyn Richardson

Aside from lowering your risk for chronic disease, living longer, and being a good role model to your children, some have emotional and psychological reasons for wanting to lose weight.  Without delving into those reasons, we may find ourselves unable to maintain our goal weight, or worst, lose the pounds only to repeat our old lifestyle because we’ve not yet addressed our past issues.  I confess to having irrational thoughts as to why I wanted to lose weight leading up to my journey of losing 50 pounds.  Some I thought were positive motivation for weight loss, but at second glance, may have hampered me from embracing life.  Below are some common lies people give for wanting to lose weight, and the truth behind them.      

The Lie: I’ll be more successful if I lose weight.
The Truth: Your goals are tied to your belief that they will happen, not some number on a scale. 

While many studies have come out that speak of the real discrimination that overweight men and women experience, many of us unreasonably blame our failures on our weight, and thus we’ve made it ok not to step forward confidently to achieve our purpose.   Since childhood I’d visualized a skinnier me walking down the aisle.  Leading up to my wedding day, I was fixated on my weight, and lost out on some of the happiness I’d found in getting married.  Visualizations that disqualify your current self from experiencing certain milestones can be dangerous.  You can be happy.  Don’t punish yourself by sitting out of the spotlight.  No matter what you weigh, you can achieve what you’re working towards.  Pursue what you’ve set out to do with the same vigor you would if you loved the way you look.

The Lie: I’ll fit in better if I lose weight.
The Truth: You only want to fit in when you’re at your ideal weight.

It feels good to hear all the well wishes that people spew out when they start to notice your weight loss, doesn’t it? Guess what, even at that feel-good time, you’re sticking out like a sore thumb.  So why is it ok then, but when you’re overweight, and no one has much to say, you feel you don’t fit in?  The answer lies in your self-talk. Allow yourself to acknowledge all the things that affect your ability to fit in, including your personality, experiences, social aptitude, and the people around you, and assess your ability to “fit in” as the complex thing that it is.  At any given moment, you could fit in or not fit in. You’re not stuck in an abyss because of your weight.  It’s about your daily environment, of which is consistently changing.  There’s no scale to step on before you start a conversation.  Go for it.

The Lie: So and so will treat me better if I lose weight.
The Truth: The way someone treats you depends on respect and concern for your feelings, not your weight.

One of the biggest motivations many people have for losing weight is acceptance by a significant other, relative, or friend who they perceive will treat them better if they lose the pounds.  Unfortunately, when the weight comes off, and the initial kudos go away, the pervasive negativity in that relationship will manifest itself in another way.  Don’t allow yourself to be motivated to please others, if and when it forces you to sacrifice your feelings for theirs.  If you truly want to lose weight to feel healthier, hike up a mountain, or play with your children more, do it.  But if you think your husband’s going to treat you better solely based on a scale, chances are you may be disappointed. 


Your thoughts…

What lies do you struggle with about why you want to lose weight?  What is the truth behind them?



Comments


Comment Removed

I never thought any of these things when I was overweight....



Ouch!... I still have a lot of self talk 'fire' to extinguish!  I really must learn to love and be compassionate to myself.  Thank you, Ms. Richardson for this pertinent article. 



Comment Removed

Thank you for this article. I can totally relate.

 

I have made all these mistakes before, when I was a teenager, the first time I lost weight.

I was 15 and was driven to lose weight solely for the above lies. I thought all my problems would be over as soon as I lost the weight, and of course, they weren't. I basically postponed my life until I would lose the weight.

Naturally, I gained it all back within the next few years.

It took me years to really understand the mechanisms of my mind and motivation, but I have ridded myself of a lot of such dellusions, and a lot of psychological hurdles, as well.

I realized that I was an emotional eater, and that, in reality, the main reason why I found it so difficult to lose weight was because I was afraid of failure and had no faith in myself, in general.

I thought if I would stay fat people would just let me be a loser.

I am 22 now, and on my "second try", with a bit more realistic expectations.

All I am hoping to get out of weight loss now is better health, higher energy level, and the chance to wear all the clothes I like.

In parallel, I have started on rebuilding my life, in all other areas, as well.



Comment Removed

Evil Eye Cherry,

I read your post. It sounds like you have a goal and plan that you can live with but when I looked at your profile pics and you seem so sad. Please be happy that you are taking control of other areas in your life also. We have all stubbled upon hard times. Take care,

Darlene



Looks like there is a stalker on this comment board.



I am needing to loss weight for 2 reasons. Had heart surgery last December and need to keep an eye on my weight. I am also having trouble getting into some of my dress clothes for work. May be cheaper to loss a little weight than to buy that bigger size in pants.



Yes, I was thinking the same thing.............creepy



Actually, I have come to realize that I struggle with a reason not to lose weight.  I have concluded that I will go so far in declining, and then creep back up.  When I was thin, I had trouble relating to and "fending off" the opposite sex.  Now that I am older, I realize I do not wish to add that stress to my life, and every time I come close to marking a significant breakthrough in my weight, I inch back up.  My issue, but I must say, very good points in this article:  people should and must accept you for who you are; "fitting in" is often over-rated, just be yourself; and success depends more on your personality, values and ambition than on how you look.  Our society can be so hurtful.  Maybe a lot of this is because I am about to hit 50 and a lot of the above issues just don't matter to me anymore.  It is so liberating.



"Don't try to blend in; God created you to stand out."



I am an athlete. I practice MMA, boxing, Kickboxing, Muy Thai, everything except judo and Juijitsu. In the past year I started thinking about how much faster/stronger/better athlete I could be if a dropped some poundage. Also, my family has all sorts of things going on health wise, diabetes and heart disease to name a few. Since hitting 30 I have been thinking that it is time I take charge of my health so I can have a more fruitful life. So far I have lost 10 lbs. 20 more to go.



Comment Removed

Yah its sad that I've only ever wanted to be thin to look good.. Ive never even thought about the health perspective. seriously.



ive been on both sides of the coin.  when i was younger i worked out all the time.  i looked great!  the problem was, i didnt have any girlfriends.  maybe it was the whole "they are threatened by me because im hot" thing.  then i got married, had three kids and "let myself go".  now i have lots of girlfriends.  i feel like i fit in with the other moms who are in the same boat as me.  we are comfortable with each other, we dont have to compete over anything like weight.  while at my biggest i actually said that i would not sacrifice my friends in order to look like i used to.  maybe it was just an excuse to keep from making a change.  now i have been diagnosed with heart disease so i must exercise, eat right and subsequently i have lost weight.  so now i am a bit worried that i wont fit in any more.  i guess i have always been insecure about things so i will continue to do so no matter what.  im hoping i can shake this off and be comfortable in my own skin.



Original Post by: ellektra

I never thought any of these things when I was overweight....


Me neither.



Real, honest reasons I want to lose weight:

  1. So I can have my picture taken and not DREAD seeing it afterward.
  2. So my body reflects all the hard work I put in eating healthy and exercising.
  3. Because I've never been "thin," and I want to know what that's like.
  4. To prove to myself that I can do it if I keep trying, that this goal that I've been working on my entire life is achievable.
  5. To feel more attractive. Yup, I said it. Blurp. 

Here's a question: even if your motivations for losing weight are not the healthiest (ex: I want to be able to fit in), is it okay to lose weight, as long as you do it in a healthy way (balanced diet, moderate exercise, with reasonable deficits)?



I agree. Whoever this "just email me" guy is needs to stop now.



To look good naked



Comment Removed

I don't want to jiggle when I walk anymore, and I want to look better in my clothes.  I am tired of my waistbands pinching me.  But I really love food; my worst problem is portion control.  When something is good, I just want to keep eating it!  I didn't think any of the above things either; that kind of thinking is a path I never followed.  But when you bend over to tie your shoes or to sit up from lying down and your stomach gets in the way and you squish it, it's very uncomfortable and I'd like to get rid of that feeling.

 



There are benefits to loosing weight such as looking good, being able to find clothes easier and what not but those are all pretty superficial.  All of my close relatives are overweight to obese and have health problems such as diabetes and heart related issues.  My mom's brother has had a hip replacement and two knee surgeries and my mom one knee surgery so far all because of the extra weight they have been carrying around for years.  My reason for loosing weight is I don't want to have to go through that, not saying that other genetically related health problems wont get me but at least there is one thing I can control in all this.



My motivation is to meet both physical and social acceptance.
I physically must lose weight and emotionally I want to be accepted when I walk into a job interview.  It is hard to convince a new employer that you will do a good job for them if you are not taking good care of your own health.  I am an HR professional and know the positive and negative of both sides of this
issue. 

I believe society values people by their ability to manage their own problems, if you are overweight, for whatever reason they do not want to take on that liability.  Healthy people work harder and have more endurance. Not that there isn’t value in all people, there is, but for some jobs you have to be fit or they will not accept you. I heard from a friend that her 18 year old wanted to go into the Navy but was not able to because she weighed over 160 lbs. I am not sure how much over the 160 she weighed but it is a struggle to find a place to fit into when you have weight issues.  

At least for me, I want to be viewed as someone who will be a healthy person who is in control of her own life and being thinner is a way to be accepted.  Am I wrong?



I emplore anyone and everyone NOT to lose weight for the sake of losing weight or ANY other reason other than: YOUR HEALTH.  Any other reason for losing weight is esoteric.  There is only ONE REAL REASON to lose weight and that is to be healthier.  All of the other reason are benefits of being healthier.  

In fact, even if you just focus on being optimally healthy, you will likely lose weight as a by-product of this focus.  So, forget about how much you weigh. Forget about how you look.  Forget about what others think.

FOCUS ON YOUR HEALTH. 

When you do, you will eat correctly, you will exercise with a purpose, you will drink water with enthusiasm, and you will sleep with peace of mind.  The weight will come off automatically as a result.

Good luck.

PM me if you have questions.  I speak from experience and knowledge.



Original Post by: bpar289617174

My motivation is to meet both physical and social acceptance.
I physically must lose weight and emotionally I want to be accepted when I walk into a job interview.  It is hard to convince a new employer that you will do a good job for them if you are not taking good care of your own health.  I am an HR professional and know the positive and negative of both sides of this
issue. 

I believe society values people by their ability to manage their own problems, if you are overweight, for whatever reason they do not want to take on that liability.  Healthy people work harder and have more endurance. Not that there isn’t value in all people, there is, but for some jobs you have to be fit or they will not accept you. I heard from a friend that her 18 year old wanted to go into the Navy but was not able to because she weighed over 160 lbs. I am not sure how much over the 160 she weighed but it is a struggle to find a place to fit into when you have weight issues.  

At least for me, I want to be viewed as someone who will be a healthy person who is in control of her own life and being thinner is a way to be accepted.  Am I wrong?


I'm in no position to judge wheter you are right or wrong.  However, it sounds like you could be judging yourself and others rather harshly.  Society tends to make a lot of negative judgements based on appearances.  We have to be very careful not to buy into unrealistic social standards and stereotypes.  There is so much more to your worth (and work ethic Smile) than your weight, or appearance otherwise.



Original Post by: bpar289617174

My motivation is to meet both physical and social acceptance.
I physically must lose weight and emotionally I want to be accepted when I walk into a job interview.  It is hard to convince a new employer that you will do a good job for them if you are not taking good care of your own health.  I am an HR professional and know the positive and negative of both sides of this
issue. 

I believe society values people by their ability to manage their own problems, if you are overweight, for whatever reason they do not want to take on that liability.  Healthy people work harder and have more endurance. Not that there isn’t value in all people, there is, but for some jobs you have to be fit or they will not accept you. I heard from a friend that her 18 year old wanted to go into the Navy but was not able to because she weighed over 160 lbs. I am not sure how much over the 160 she weighed but it is a struggle to find a place to fit into when you have weight issues.  

At least for me, I want to be viewed as someone who will be a healthy person who is in control of her own life and being thinner is a way to be accepted.  Am I wrong?


I'm in no position to judge wheter you are right or wrong.  However, it sounds like you could be judging yourself and others rather harshly.  Society tends to make a lot of negative judgements based on appearances.  We have to be very careful not to buy into unrealistic social standards and stereotypes.  There is so much more to your worth (and work ethic Smile) than your weight, or appearance otherwise.



The woman in the picture looks like a convict with her messy hair and her orange shirt. I was legitimately confused when I clicked on it and read the article. I realize it's supposed to be a woman thinking, but it looks too much like the pictures they show on the news of people who got arrested.



Comment Removed

Original Post by: meli71

I don't want to jiggle when I walk anymore, and I want to look better in my clothes.  I am tired of my waistbands pinching me.  But I really love food; my worst problem is portion control.  When something is good, I just want to keep eating it!  I didn't think any of the above things either; that kind of thinking is a path I never followed.  But when you bend over to tie your shoes or to sit up from lying down and your stomach gets in the way and you squish it, it's very uncomfortable and I'd like to get rid of that feeling.

 


This is part of my reason to lose weight.  I also don't want to be out of breath after doing minor exercise.  Part of my problem is that I don't like being hot and getting sweaty...I know that seems silly, I can take a shower after; somehow I have to get past that.  Undecided  I also want to be thinner for my health, ease the weight on my joints.  I also want to be sexier for my  man.  He's very supportive and I know he loves me, so it's not coming from him, it's me.  So, just trying to make myself happy and be healthier.



Boy we waste so much time worrying how we fit in.  so much..   instead of using our time to develope talents(writing, art, ect)exploring new ideas and thoughts, we get sidetracked on spending time and thinking how we look shows what is within, since my weight gain, I am writing, writing poetry, decorate some fabulous cakes, really look at the heart of people,  I am losing a bit at a time, doing well, but i would not trade this new found talent I had harboring in me for anything.  I never would have taken the time before.



I suppose the point of this article is to promote self esteem and to point out that the problems in life that you blame on your weight, may not be. Point taken. That being said, there are a lot of studies that prove that, if you're significantly overweight, chances are you're the victim of societal prejudice.

In one study, both adults and children as young as six rated the photos of overweight people as "least likable", using adjectives like "dirty", "lazy", "incompetent", and "self-indulgent". (Crossrow, 2001, p. 208) Thin People are seen as "doers", "good looking" and "vigorous".

Employers see obese people as "less desirable employees who, compared to others are less competent, less productive, not industrious, disorganized, indecisive, inactive and less successful" (Larkin, 1979, p. 315-316). Typically, three main reasons are cited by employers to not hire an obese person: company image, insurance costs and future health conditions, and physical limitations.

Is it any wonder that we, ourselves, tend to think that we're less successful, don't fit in, etc.? Although some of those feelings may be unfounded, weight discrimination is REAL. It is not a fantasy that we're using to blame our personal failures on.



Original Post by: themcmaster

Real, honest reasons I want to lose weight:

  1. So I can have my picture taken and not DREAD seeing it afterward.
  2. So my body reflects all the hard work I put in eating healthy and exercising.
  3. Because I've never been "thin," and I want to know what that's like.
  4. To prove to myself that I can do it if I keep trying, that this goal that I've been working on my entire life is achievable.
  5. To feel more attractive. Yup, I said it. Blurp. 

Here's a question: even if your motivations for losing weight are not the healthiest (ex: I want to be able to fit in), is it okay to lose weight, as long as you do it in a healthy way (balanced diet, moderate exercise, with reasonable deficits)?


my answer: Regardless of motivation, I think it's always a good idea to get to a healthy weight in a healthy way. I think the issue is with the wrong motivation, you're less likely to keep the weight off and more likely to seek unhealthy ways to lose the weight. This has been my personal experience at least.



I think the biggest thing I struggle with as being maybe the wrong motivation for losing weight is that I think that I won't be able to find a boyfriend/husband if I don't lose weight. I've never had a boyfriend and I've been overweight since junior high, so I always kind of assumed the reason I couldn't find one was because of my weight. Unfortunately, even though I weigh less than I have in years, I still sort of believe that. I feel as though once I'm at my ideal weight I'll be more confident with guys and as a result might actually get a date or something.
Part of me knows this is probably a "lie" I'm telling myself but I've never really found a reason to believe otherwise yet.
I do appreciate this article, though, because some of those were things I thought about too.



Original Post by: wardea11

I think the biggest thing I struggle with as being maybe the wrong motivation for losing weight is that I think that I won't be able to find a boyfriend/husband if I don't lose weight. I've never had a boyfriend and I've been overweight since junior high, so I always kind of assumed the reason I couldn't find one was because of my weight. Unfortunately, even though I weigh less than I have in years, I still sort of believe that. I feel as though once I'm at my ideal weight I'll be more confident with guys and as a result might actually get a date or something.
Part of me knows this is probably a "lie" I'm telling myself but I've never really found a reason to believe otherwise yet.
I do appreciate this article, though, because some of those were things I thought about too.


Wardea11, take it from an old, married woman of 28--these ideas you have about needing to be thin to be loved and wanted are issues you have with yourself, and I hate to say it but they won't go away even if you find true love.  On the flip side, your appearance (unless extremely unhealthy or unhygienic) shouldn't stop you from finding love that really matters.  If you are active, healthy, and confident (or even just pretend you're confident!) guys find that attractive.  [Good] guys aren't as neurotic as we are about weight, and care more about your personality, your energy and whether you make them feel happy.  The fact that we girls have boobs tends to distract them from our saddlebags.  ;-) 

The best thing you can do as a single girl on the road to weight loss is make yourself healthy and fit.  Forget skinny--focus on fitness and the skinny will eventually come, but you'll feel good about those developing muscles while you wait.  The trick to a starting a good relationship with someone is to be happy being single first--to know yourself and be proud of yourself so that you take that self-value into the relationship.  Guys respect you more if you respect yourself.  If you become fitter, it will make you happier and more energetic, and then you have that energy to give to someone when you eventually find them.



I want to lose weight so that:

1.  I can wear certain styles of clothes that I like that look better on someone thinner.

2.  My boobs are the only things jiggling when I run.

3.  I can cosplay as some of my favorite anime characters next year!

4.  I don't have joint problems when I'm older.



I actually hate walking into a classroom, because I feel as if everyone is staring at me. This is just paranoia with my own issues, and I realize I am in college for an education, and not a popularity contest. I feel like that nonetheless. 

 

Some of my reasons...:

1.) Like a lot of other women, I want to wear cute clothes.
2.)I have never worn a bikini, I'd like to try that out sometime.

3.)I want my "c-section sag" to not look so gross under t-shirts. (That might be TMI, but whatever)

4.)I don't want my shin splits to feel like they are on fire just to walk down the street.

5.)Honestly, I don't want to regret being 60 and looking back thinking I could have done it at 22.

There are a lot of other reasons, but we'll leave it at that.

 



I can definitely relate to some of those. I use to have the mindset that if I could just lose weight I would be happier and fit in more with my peers or if I lost weight I would be more attractive. After some great counseling sessions (which I highly recommend to anyone!) I realized that I was hiding behind my weight as an excuse to not have to be social because being social could potentially lead to me getting hurt or feeling uncomfortable. Sure, I still am trying to get healthy and lose some weight, but I'm doing it for me now. (:



What happens when you've completely lost your motivation and you no longer know why you want to lose weight? Because when I started out, I knew I was sick and tired of being fat and I wanted to bloody well fix it. But then I lost 80 pounds and hit the plateua from hell and got so sick of getting no reward for all the work I was putting in that I stopped putting in the work.  And now I've gained back nearly 15 pounds, which I know is entirely my own fault, but even though I want to start losing again my motivation just isn't there, so going through the motions feels kind of pointless.



I want to not feel like I'm going to die, when I go on a hike with my family.



Original Post by: nhakblove

What happens when you've completely lost your motivation and you no longer know why you want to lose weight? Because when I started out, I knew I was sick and tired of being fat and I wanted to bloody well fix it. But then I lost 80 pounds and hit the plateua from hell and got so sick of getting no reward for all the work I was putting in that I stopped putting in the work.  And now I've gained back nearly 15 pounds, which I know is entirely my own fault, but even though I want to start losing again my motivation just isn't there, so going through the motions feels kind of pointless.


Kelly, you've hit on the hardest part of losing weight - staying motivated. Your story is much like mine. I hit a long, long, long plateau and lost my motivation. Gaining back 15 pounds isn't the end of the world - I gained back 100 of the 110 pounds I lost several years back and am now virtually starting from scratch. I wish now that I had recognized that staying at that lower weight was, in itself, a reward for my hard work.  I'm back on track now and have lost 20 since April.

I joined a gym and made a deal with myself to "just show up". So 5 days a week I drag myself there and get on the elliptical. I tell myself I can leave after 5 minutes (I'm such a liar) if I don't feel like doing more - most of the time I get at least 30 minutes of cardio before I leave, often much more than that.

When you're young, you tend to focus on the social aspects of losing weight - being attractive to the opposite sex, looking cute in clothes, etc. Those things are wonderful but realistically, changing your life to include exercise and a healthy diet need to be permanent changes for a healthy, long life without the misery of weight related problems like diabetes, aching joints, heart disease and the like.

Plateaus don't last forever (really!). Get back on track and try to let the healthy lifestyle be its own reward - the pounds will come off eventually. By next summer you'll be wearing shorts and tank tops and bikinis AND you will have healthy habits that will pay off with years and years of glowing good health and vitality.

Good luck to you, Kelly. I will keep you in my prayers.

 

 



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I have lost weight several times thinking it would change my lifestyle.  The truth is that nothing changed except my clothing size.  Just being healthy just doesn't seem worth it.  How can I get a different attitude?



To be in control of myself. And to see my six pack one more time before I die.



I guess I would fit into this category of having all the wrong reasons =[ As of now I don't even know why ...I can think of a zillion reasons why!! but the one that I think of most is just so I will finally be happy with myself. I want to make my boyfriend happy (he says I don't need to lose any-weight) I want to finally be thin and small and not look like a hefty meatball all the time! =[ Gosh my brain is so must up on such vain things...I have this mindset that everything will be better when I lose weight (I'll be successful, more attractive)and right now I still have half of my life on hold because of not being at the # I desire. People have mistreated me. Teased me for being fat, teased me for being stupid, you name it. Almost every adult that's been in my life has abused me! Being fat has always been the blame for everything ''They tease me cus I'm fat'' ''She will love me if I am thin and pretty like her!'' ''I'll be excepted if I do as she does!'' And I am just so eager to play follow the leader....Well not anymore. Life starts now. Life is now. Some how I'll regain some type of self worth threw this journey...and shift my focus toward running a marathon rather than being a certain number this week. Life is NOW.



Original Post by: themcmaster

Real, honest reasons I want to lose weight:

  1. So I can have my picture taken and not DREAD seeing it afterward.
  2. So my body reflects all the hard work I put in eating healthy and exercising.
  3. Because I've never been "thin," and I want to know what that's like.
  4. To prove to myself that I can do it if I keep trying, that this goal that I've been working on my entire life is achievable.
  5. To feel more attractive. Yup, I said it. Blurp. 

Here's a question: even if your motivations for losing weight are not the healthiest (ex: I want to be able to fit in), is it okay to lose weight, as long as you do it in a healthy way (balanced diet, moderate exercise, with reasonable deficits)?


Same here, non of those ever cross my mind and kind of even funny to think that there are people who think that way.. do they really?



the reasons i want to lose weight are for all the wrong reasons..the superficial ones..wanting to look good, buy nice clothes, stop people saying i'm fat, improve my self confidence and have a successful date. All my friends are much thinner and when we go out of course they get all the attention.

 

But at the end of the day the health benefits of being a healthy weight far outweigh the superficial reasons in the long term, especially if there is a family history of health problems. Wish I could focus more on these reasons. 

 



It is interesting article. I'm a 64 year old woman who's the queen of yo-yoing. I went to Durham NC back in 1984 and went out the rice diet, lost 80 lbs. Unfortunately I wasn't able to keep the weight off because I didn't implement a lifestyle change.  I was so down for having "failed" and though I went back a couple of more time to loose some of the weight I gained in the end I regained all the weight and then some. For a long time I just gave up.  Finally having a score of health problems- bad knees, sleep apnea, atrial fib and flutter, pre-diabetic, high cholesterol, high blood pressure- I finally did something about my weight. Nothing like having my orthopedic surgeon say " you need to loose 50lbs before I can operate on you as I wont take the risk of having you die on the operating table. "

Because I had such a history of yo-yoing I made the radical decision to have gastric by pass surgery. All total I have lost 148lbs since April 1st 2010  (42lbs of that weight I lost prior to surgery). It has been the best thing I have done. BUT the most important thing is that Gastric-by-Pass still isn't  a quick fix and it is all about life-style change.   I can walk without pain - I had bi-lateral knee replacements in October- and oh how I love to exercise.  It is one of the greatest highs to be able to swim for 75 minutes, to lift weight, do pilates. All my health problems have vanished and I am down from 15 meds a day to 2.

I can't wait to go hiking in the Grand Tetons this September.



I want to lose weight because it has been a life long struggle. Every day I think about my weight, and how unhappy I am with my body. I feel one way, and look another.

It would be nice to be happy with myself inside and out, and to stop the emotional rollercoaster that accompanies my weight struggles.



I'm 45 and had a hip replacement when I was 43. You don't have to be overweight to have hip and knee problems. Sometimes you just wear out your cartilage from working out so hard.



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